HR Headlines – Naukri.com Newsletter

Hiring up by 19% in January 2016 over January 2015: Naukri Job Speak Report
Naukri Job Speak Index for the month of January 2016 stood at 1748 recording a 19% increase in hiring activity over January 2015. IT-Software records an impressive 22% Y-o-Y growth, BPO/ITES has grown by 26%, Auto/Auto Ancillary is up by 9% followed by Banking and Telecom at 6% and 5% respectively whereas Oil and Gas continues to struggle with an -18% dip in the Jan’ 2016 index. Demand for professionals in ITES/BPO has grown by 31%, Banking by 25% and IT-Software by 20%. Among the metros, Delhi/NCR witnessed the maximum growth of 30%, Mumbai follows with 20% and Bangalore has grown by 17% in the Y-o-Y growth chart of Naukri Job Speak Index for the month of January 2016.
Source : 10-02-16   Naukri.com   Compiled by www.naukri.com
Big consultancies dominate hiring at IIM-B placement
Management consultants such as Bain & Co, Accenture, Deloitte and The Boston Consulting Group were the biggest recruiters from the Indian Institute of Management here, hiring nearly a third of the 409 graduating this year. Venture capital-funded e-commerce companies, toast of IIM placements in recent years, picked fewer students as they focus on stabilising their business models in the midst of a fund crisis. “Though there was a slight dip in e-commerce hiring, the consulting firms hired in larger numbers and helped accelerate the placements,” said Mr. Ganesh N Prabhu, head of the institute’s career development services. Around 160 companies came and made 450 offers across 200 job profiles. Around 139 pre-placement offers were made, beside 136 lateral offers for experienced people. “In fact, consulting companies would have hired more students this year if they were available,” said a staffer. Eighteen students were offered placements for global locations. Two forwent their pre-placement offers, which included one from a leading multinational financial services entity, to continue on an entrepreneurial venture. Other companies included Goldman Sachs, Kotak Investment Bank, ICICI Securities, YES Bank, India Value Funds and Avendus Capital. Larger companies included the Aditya Birla Group, Reliance Industries, Mahindra Group, Larsen & Toubro and General Electric. Prominent recruiters in information technology included Microsoft, Samsung and Infosys. In IT consulting, IBM and Capgemini recruited. E-commerce had Amazon and Flipkart making 16 and 11 offers, respectively. Other e-commerce recruiters included Uber, Ola, Paytm, Urban Ladder, AskmeBazaar, Hopscotch, and CarTrade. “In addition to the continued interest shown by traditional recruiters, we also saw close to 25 per cent first-time recruiters who hired in good numbers,” said Mr. M Krishna, placement representative.
Source : 12-02-16   Business-standard.com   Compiled by www.naukri.com
E-commerce to generate 2.5 lakh Jobs in 2016: Assocham Report
E-commerce is set to generate 2.5 lakh jobs this year. Hiring in the sector is expected to grow at 60-65%. Most e-commerce businesses have increased their turnover and will develop further, said the Assocham report. “E-commerce industry is likely to generate nearly 2.5 lakhs jobs in the online retail in 2016 including temporary employees, supply chain, logistics, ancillary units etc,” it said. India’s e-commerce market went up to $17 billion in 2014 and to $23 billion in 2015. It is expected to touch $38 billion mark by 2016, it said. There are nearly 3.5 lakh people working with e-commerce companies. Smartphone ownership and investment from retailers are fuelling the rapid growth of mobile-commerce in India.
Source : 05-02-16   Businessinsider.in   Compiled by www.naukri.com
Jobs galore: Paytm on a hiring spree; poaches talent across industries!
Paytm wants to strengthen its payments bank operations and is on a hiring spree in the same regard. India’s largest mobile payments platform, Paytm, is poaching talent across industries and is even looking to hire around 3,000 employees for the new business, which has a starting budget of Rs 400 crore. For the starters, Paytm hired former Airtel executive Mr. Saurabh Sharma, who was heading market operations at Airtel Money, as vice-president and will handle merchant and agent acquisition. Paytm also brought Mr. Dhruv Dhanraj Bahl from Bain & Company as assistant vice-president and he will lead the branch designs and their roll out across the country. Ms. Neha Gupta from KMPG will join in as deputy general manager soon and will handle business operations. “We’ve shortlisted people for the CEO position and hopefully we should be able to communicate it when the RBI gives us a go ahead,” Paytm chief executive officer Mr. Vijay Shekhar Sharma said, adding “We’ve decided to put the budget for the payments bank at Rs 400 crore for two years. “Over 20 senior and mid-management level executives have been hired to kick-start the payments bank operations. Paytm will decide on what to offer as a part of payments bank operations, including cardless credit card backed by a bank. RBI, in last year August, granted payments bank licences to 11 applicants including Paytm, Reliance Industries, Bharti Airtel and Vodafone.
Source : 08-02-16   Businessinsider.in   Compiled by www.naukri.com
Google gives CEO Mr. Sundar Pichai record $199 million in vested stock
Google Inc.’s Mr. Sundar Pichai is poised to become one of the highest-paid executives of a publicly traded company this year after parent Alphabet Inc. awarded him restricted stock worth about $199 million. Mr. Pichai, who took over in August as Google’s chief executive officer (CEO) from co-founder Larry page, received a grant for 273,328 Class C Google stock units on February 3. The valuation is based on the stock’s closing price on that date. On the same day, the Google CEO sold 375 Class A common shares at a price of $786.28 each, and sold another 3,625 Class C capital stock at a price of $768.84 each, the filing said. According to data analysis, this is the most lucrative award ever given to a Google chief executive. The Class C shares can be availed in quarterly increments through till 2019, provided Mr. Pichai stays in his position till then. The report further said that the India-born American has been appointed to his position for at least three years. It is not uncommon for Google to award executives restricted stock about once every two years in a bid to motivate them and to incentivised them to take a long-term view of the business. Ms. Ruth Porat, CFO of Alphabet, was given $38.3 million worth of equity, according to the filing. Her equity will vest under the same conditions as Mr. Pichai – in quarterly increments till 2019 if she remains on the job.
Source : 09-02-16   Business-standard.com   Compiled by www.naukri.com
Infosys is renewing its appraisal system too, will reward employees with ‘iCount’
Under Mr. Vishal Sikka’s ‘new and renew’ strategy, Infosys is doing away with bell curve appraisal system and is bringing ‘iCount’ in place. Under iCount, employees will be rewarded on specific short term targets and will be given feedbacks throughout the year. Infosys employees will also be rewarded on the basis of how well they perform on specific short-term but important targets during the year. “Infosys has changed the way performance management is done, with higher focus on individual performance rather than relative performance. We have moved away from forced ranking curve and given our managers more flexibility and empowerment, while still retaining focus on maintaining a high performance culture,” Infosys spokeswoman said. Infosys had last year scrapped the bell curve method for its 1, 93,000 employees to follow a more open ranking system. Recently, IBM adopted the Checkpoint appraisal system.
Source : 08-02-16   Businessinsider.in   Compiled by www.naukri.com
Mr. Mukesh Bansal logs out of Flipkart
Mr. Mukesh Bansal, who was heading the commerce and advertising business of Flipkart, quit, weeks after the co-founder of the country’s largest e-commerce company, Mr. Binny Bansal, became the chief executive officer. Flipkart also lost another senior executive, Mr. Ankit Nagori, its chief business officer. Mr. Mukesh Bansal, who founded Myntra, was leading the online fashion retailer as chairman, after selling it to Flipkart two years ago. He ceded its control to Mr. Binny Bansal in January. Now, Mr. Binny Bansal, who has built Flipkart’s operations since inception, will consolidate the organisation, as competition increases from rivals such as Snapdeal and Amazon. According to a Kotak Institutional Equities report, Flipkart has lost market share to Amazon and Snapdeal and grown slower than both in FY15. “I will help in the transition, and then, will take a break,” said Mr. Mukesh Bansal. “After that, I will look at starting out in the tech space.” Analysts claimed Myntra’s merger with Flipkart in 2014 was engineered by common investors on boards of both the companies. Mr. Mukesh Bansal’s exit was imminent after an obligatory stay at the online marketplace.
Source : 11-02-16   Business-standard.com   Compiled by www.naukri.com
Mr. Rishad Premji for performance vested stock option plan
Mr. Rishad Premji, Wipro’s chief strategy officer and board member, mooted the concept of a performance vested stock option plan instead of the current practice of a time vested strategy. Participating in a panel discussion on the theme – Surviving success: breaking the next growth barrier – at the Nasscom NLF forum, Mr. Premji suggested that even the compensation structure needs to be changed which could have the benefits both from a long and short term perspective. Wipro currently follows the restricted stock unit (RSU) employee stock option plan which provides these shares to a certain category of executives. On the current disruption in the industry, Mr. Premji said organisations need to take their chances and place their bets on certain things. “It is okay to fail as long as we are servicing the stakeholders and not the shareholders,” he remarked. He felt that the risks taken by the organisation needs to be well communicated to the stakeholders and set the right expectations on what one can expect from the company. The chief strategy officer of Wipro said they were leveraging various strategies like building intellectual property, creating solutions, investing in startups so as to identify the next growth areas for the company. “We have to build a differentiation and have a certain belief in new ideas,” Mr. Premji said. He strongly felt that automation will be big theme for the IT services industry as large part of the business was getting commoditised. “If we do not automate then somebody else will bring about the change,” he said. Automation has become a big theme for Wipro as it is able to employ these technologies in its various service lines thereby freeing up human resources and being utilized in other areas like digital.
Source : 11-02-16   Financialexpress.com   Compiled by www.naukri.com
Air India freezes hiring of casual workers; to trim excess staff
Air India chairman and managing director Mr. Ashwani Lohani has ordered freeze on hiring of casual labour, and shifting some of them who work as ground handlers and in engineering department to subsidiary companies. The services of the rest would be terminated. This is the latest in the several cost-cutting decisions taken by Mr. Lohani, known as a turnaround man, to cut over Rs 50,000 crore debt in the national carrier. “No fresh face casual labour is to be engaged. This may be noted for strict compliance. It will be the personal responsibility of the EDs (executive directors) and GM (finance) of the region to ensure this.” said an order recently issued by Mr. Lohani and sent to all senior officials of the airline. Mr. Lohani, in his letter added, “The existing casual strength of AI should be reviewed with a view to their discontinuation or shifting of those casuals who are doing work on ground handling or engineering to the AIATSL or AIESL, respectively.” The issue of casual workers has been a contentious one as around 2,000-odd working with the airline largely remained unorganised and unrepresented, and claim to be getting raw deal from the management. Casual loaders at the airline are paid as per the work requirement while the permanent ones are on payroll. Mr. Viji Jagtap, president of Air India Kamgar Sanghatana, an association of casual workers, said they have not been taken on payroll despite various court orders in the past since 1996. Air India has a 21,000 strong workforce, which amounts to around Rs 3,400 crore in annual wage bill. The airline is presently surviving on aid of Rs 30,000 crore from the central government.
Source : 10-02-16   Dnaindia.com   Compiled by www.naukri.com
Google search Chief Mr. Amit Singhal to retire
Google said its long time search Chief Mr. Amit Singhal is retiring and will be replaced by Mr. John Giannandrea, an executive who has worked on machine intelligence efforts. Mr. Singhal joined Google in 2000 and has led the technical development of the Internet search engine since then. Improvements overseen by Mr. Singhal have helped make the eponymous web-search tool faster, smarter and able to peer into the innards of software running on mobile devices. At the same time, it was augmented with clever widgets like calculators and weather forecasts that materialize in response to certain queries. “When I started, who would have imagined that in a short period of 15 years, we would tap a button, ask Google anything and get the answer,” Mr. Singhal wrote in a Google+ post announcing his retirement. “My dream Star Trek computer is becoming a reality, and it is far better than what I ever imagined.” With Mr. Giannandrea’s appointment, the technology may get smarter. The executive has overseen recent artificial intelligence efforts, including RankBrain, which saw Google plug an AI technology called a neural network into its search engine to boost the accuracy of results and an e-mail service called Smart Reply that automatically writes responses. Other work he has managed include efforts in image recognition and technologies that fetch information based on what users are doing with their devices, rather than what they’re explicitly searching for.
Source : 04-02-16   Livemint.com   Compiled by www.naukri.com
Aegis to hire about 7,000 in FY17, ramp up global presence
Business process management company Aegis said it will hire 7,000 people globally, of which around half will be in India, and open more centres in key markets like Malaysia and South Africa in 2016-17. “We would be hiring about 7,000 people globally in the next fiscal. Of these, about 3,000-3,500 (hirings) would be in India,” said the company’s Global Chief Executive Mr. Sandip Sen. He said this is part of a three-year plan of taking the total number of employees to 55,000, from the present strength of 40,000. In India, the e-commerce, banking and finance, and telecom verticals are the major engines of business growth, he said. At present, Aegis operates 25 centres in the country, of which seven in smaller cities like Karnal, Shimoga and Guwahati were added last year, he said. The company is looking to open one to two centres in the country next fiscal, he said. He said there are some difficulties when it comes to skill-sets in smaller centres, and added that government initiatives on skilling would help the industry. Among its international markets, he said Malaysia and Saudi Arabia are witnessing good traction. Aegis is targeting to open a third centre in Malaysia, in either Penang or Iskandar, entailing an investment of up to $4 million over a three-year period, he said.
Source : 11-02-16   Business-standard.com   Compiled by www.naukri.com
HSBC drops plan for 2016 pay freeze
HSBC, Europe’s largest bank, has dropped plans to freeze pay this year while remaining cautious on the outlook for its revenues, as per a memo from Chief Executive Mr. Stuart Gulliver. The memo comes days before HSBC’s board is set to meet to discuss whether the bank will move its headquarters to Hong Kong or stay in London. Pay rises will be funded from a bonus pool which was originally intended for payments to be made in 2017, the memo from Mr. Gulliver said. A hiring freeze will remain in place. “As flagged in our Investor Update we have targeted significant cost reductions by the end of 2017,” a spokeswoman for HSBC said in a statement. The bank, which had more than 266,000 staff at the end of 2014, plans annual cost savings of up to $5 billion by 2017.
Source : 11-02-16   Business-standard.com   Compiled by www.naukri.com
Indian IT-BPO exports to grow slower at 10-12% in FY17: Nasscom
Export growth in the country’s IT-BPO sector is expected to be slower at 10-12% next fiscal hit by currency fluctuations, especially the weakening of the rupee against the US dollar, Nasscom said. The industry is looking at 12.3% growth in the 2015-16 fiscal, ending on March 31. Last year, the IT services and software industry body had forecast a growth of 12-14% in exports. The rupee recently fell to 29-month low against the dollar. Currency movements impact the industry, which earns around 80% of the revenue from the US and Europe. Despite the impact, strong uptake of digital technologies like cloud, mobility, Internet of Things (IoT) and Big Data coupled with a rapidly growing start-up ecosystem are expected to help exports grow double-digit to reach $107.8 billion (nearly Rs 7.31 lakh crore) in 2015-16. The overall industry (along with domestic consumption and hardware) is expected to reach an estimated $143 billion (nearly Rs 9.70 lakh crore) in 2015-16. The global IT-BPO spending rose 0.4% in 2015. “Amidst a volatile global economic environment, the industry has been able to set new benchmarks by sustaining its double-digit growth,” Nasscom Chairman Mr. BVR Mohan Reddy told reporters. “Start-ups and e-commerce are the new champions of the industry and I expect these segments to increase their contribution to industry growth in the years to come,” he said, adding that India has increased its market share in global sourcing from 55% to 56%.
Source : 04-02-16   Dnaindia.com   Compiled by www.naukri.com
Yahoo announces 107 job cuts in first round of layoffs
Yahoo Inc announced it will lay off 107 employees in the first of what is expected to be more than 1,500 job cuts. The layoffs will take effect April 11 and affected employees will receive 60-day advance notice of the move, Yahoo said in a notice filed with the California Employment Development Department. The layoffs were spread across a range of departments and job titles. Yahoo Chief Executive Officer Ms. Marissa Mayer said during the company’s fourth quarter earnings call this month it will cut roughly 15 percent of its workforce as part of a strategy to revamp its core Internet business. Yahoo had about 11,000 employees as of June 30, according to its website, down from a Dec. 31, 2014, total of about 12,500 full-time employees and what it called fixed-term contractors.
Source : 11-02-16   Ibnlive.com   Compiled by www.naukri.com
Many Millennials Likely to Quit Current Jobs in 2 Years: Survey
A significant number of millennials expect to quit their current jobs in the next two years on dissatisfaction over the way their leadership skills are being developed, a survey has found. Individuals born between 1980s and late 1990s are referred to as millennials. Apart from salary, millennials in the country ranked “opportunities to progress and take on leadership roles” as their strongest reason to work for an organization, the survey by consultancy Deloitte found. “52 per cent of millennials surveyed in India say, if given the choice, they expect to leave their current employers in the next two years. That figure increases to 76 per cent when the time frame is extended to 2020,” the Millennial Survey 2016 said. When it comes to choosing an organisation, the millennial also seeks a good work-life balance and flexible working hours including the option to work from home, as per the findings. Deloitte India senior director and chief talent officer Mr. S V Nathan said the remarkable absence of allegiance represents a serious challenge to any business employing a large number of millennials, especially those in markets like India where they represent the largest segment of the workforce. According to Mr. Nathan, since most young professionals choose organisations that share their personal values, it is not too late for employers to overcome the loyalty challenge. The findings are based on a study conducted by Deloitte Global of nearly 7,700 millennials representing 29 countries. In India, the firm reached out to 300 millennials.
Source : 07-02-16   Profit.ndtv.com   Compiled by www.naukri.com

Nelson Mandela Day

Did you know…

… that today is Freedom for Nelson Mandela Day? On this day in 1990, Nelson Mandela, leader of the movement to end South African apartheid, was freed after 27 years in captivity. Mandela led the African National Congress (ANC) in its negotiations with the minority government for an end to apartheid and the establishment of a multiracial government. In 1994, he was elected South Africa’s president. He remained a global advocate for peace and social justice until his death in December 2013.

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“Instead of a sign that says: ‘Do not disturb’ I need one that says: ‘Already disturbed, proceed with caution.'”

— Author Unknown

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Ministry-wise PIB releases

2 – Interesting Pics I saw in Jan ’16

Worth writing a story about each of them0a5c5eb3-3a8c-4a8b-8336-85b395f41bcf-original7f0440b2a988226b2e12f5d08dc5e52117 equations that changed the worldc769bea9-7908-4fbd-ad23-8803179e8718-large12376210_1087975034580408_8806498326886150972_nCaQwmHXVAAANfOSBz_mBRoCQAATxJMCaRlXbwXEAQDlwcCaTqBh1VIAIlrn3boss definitionCaVU7UoXEAAqe88anxietyCaUfs_gWAAAKFQfcigarette definitiondigital CIO mindsetconference definitioncd53d2f4-1f2d-467a-8e9f-e1de5075ee3e-originaldiscipline1definition conference roomdiplomat definitiondefinition of timedeaf frogenglish is a tough languagedoctor definitionf94ed60b-7117-46d2-9779-d5a531be50f7-originalexperience definitionequality or equityHeadaches digestive problemsheadache migraineshow to runIMG_1659IMG_1662eyes are in the frontIMG_1660GUAVA for diabetesIMG_1682IMG_1670IMG_1681IMG_1683IMG_1685IMG_1684loose chips sinkIMG_1669murphy's law of comfortmarriage definitionon earningsnever test the depth of river with both feetIMG_1654on ratingson spendingIMG_1686on expectationsPencilpolitician definitionNiti aayog datasmile definintionsales statisticssinus headachesstress headachesSwiss poverty no step towtension headachesWFP Hunger map 2015what do empty pockets teachoptimist definitionthree choices15 thingsIMG_1600IMG_1608IMG_1609IMG_1607IMG_1606IMG_1612IMG_1610IMG_1613IMG_1602IMG_1614US AID TO COUNTRIESLEADERSHIP BEHAVIOURage appropriate chores for childrenRoad safety texting Economist

Interesting Pictures I saw this year – Jan ’16

Each of them are worth writing a story about … :)

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Too much or too less: India battles body mass index blues – Times of India

via Too much or too less: India battles body mass index blues – Times of India.

Kofi Annan Foundation Countering Violent Extremism – Kofi Annan Foundation

via Kofi Annan Foundation Countering Violent Extremism – Kofi Annan Foundation.

Transparency International Newsletter this week.

Today’s top story

Global: Ban £50 notes to tackle crime, ex-bank chief says
BBC

Central banks should stop issuing £50, $100 and €500 notes to tackle crime, according to a former bank boss. The high-denomination notes are favoured by terrorists, drug lords and tax evaders, argues Peter Sands, former chief executive of Standard Chartered bank, in a new report.

More news

Blogs and opinion

Global: Mark Wolf: Judge on a global mission
The Globalist (TI mention)

Indonesia: Indonesia’s anti-corruption fight
The Diplomat (TI mention)

News from Transparency International

National CleanOut your Computer Day :)

Did you know…

… that today is National Clean Out Your Computer Day? Observed on the second Monday in February, today is the day to take some time out of your busy schedule and give your computers some much needed TLC. Over time, files and programs that are unused on your computer clog the memory and cause confusion during retrieval and use of other files. They may also slow down your computer. So, get into the spirit of the day, and take a look at your files and programs on your computers and clean them out!

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“The good news about computers is that they do what you tell them to do. The bad news is that they do what you tell them to do.”

— Ted Nelson

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Ministry-wise PIB releases

10 Paradoxical Traits Of Creative People | Fast Company | Business Innovation

via 10 Paradoxical Traits Of Creative People | Fast Company | Business Innovation.

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Click here to Reply or Forward

Raghuram Rajan widens his criticism of MNCs which avoid billions in taxes – The Economic Times

Reserve Bank of India (RBI) Governor Raghuram Rajan widened his criticism of bad corporate behaviour to multi-national corporations that weave structures which help them avoid billions in taxes and said the policy obstacles in India are receding though it is a long way to go.

The government and institutions like the RBI are under pressure to promote private enterprise to ensure that millions entering the job market find employment by providing level playing field for entrepreneurs without vested interests hijacking the agenda, said Rajan.

“MNCs complain all the time about excessive taxation,” Rajan said at the Nani Palkhivala memorial lecture titled ‘Strengthening Free Enterprise’.

“But, it is also true that MNCs across the world tend to find tax avoidance and sometimes tax evasion as appropriate techniques. Some corporations find that all their intellectual property is manufactured in Cayman Islands. I haven’t seen a lot of smart scientists sitting in Cayman Islands.”

Governor Rajan’s criticism of MNCs comes in the backdrop of firms such as Vodafone and Shell, among many, complaining about India’s retrospective taxation and claims the tax department makes. In fact, tax avoidance by companies such as Google, Apple and scores of global firms have led to new laws across the world. The US brought in a law to stop companies from merging with another in a different geography for tax benefits in a process called ‘inversion’.

“We have to create tens of millions.. crores of jobs every year,” said Rajan. “We need to create those jobs because a good job is the best form of inclusion. There is tremendous pressure on the political system, and on the regulatory system to deliver those jobs. This is where democracy works through the democratic process coming out as a move towards easing way to growth and easing the way towards making it easier to open businesses.”

via Raghuram Rajan widens his criticism of MNCs which avoid billions in taxes – The Economic Times.

Shameful Bengaluru incident involving a Tanzanian woman

The Newspapers and channels are rife about the deplorable incident and the Politicians are out to make capital out of it. The Twitteratti are using Hashtags and sharing their empathy, sympathy to the Tanzanian woman and the African student community in general.

Here is my take:

While the incident is deplorable and condemnable, it is showing few – no not chinks but holes in the Central and State Government’s approach to the issue.

  1. It is an International incident and MEA Minister was quick to speak about it. However, the HRD Minister of India and the Home Minister were not quick enough.
  2. Students from Africa are a huge community in Bengaluru, Pune, Mumbai and New Delhi.  They are a great source of Foreign Exchange for 3rd and 4th grade education institutes who are making a killing by charging them 5 times higher fees while not even providing hostel accomodation.  I wonder what the HRD Ministry thinks about it. To my mind, it would have been a Unified and symbolic gesture of Indian Cabinet to send MEA, HRD and Home Ministers together to Bengaluru to meet the Tanzanian student and the student fraternity and calm them.  Globally, while Modiji spreads one message about Investments – these incidents bring the country to shame and a Unified approach by Cabinet rather than isolated statements and action are what are desirable.

  3. While the Police and investigating agencies will book the culprits including the one involved in the sad death of an Indian woman in the hit and run case which is purportedly done as per newspaper reports by a Sudanese Student – I just wish that India thinks here with a ‘Quid pro quo’ approach as Thousands of Indian students live abroad for studies and may meet the same fate.  Australian incidents on Indian students are still fresh in our memory.

  4. I sincerely wish that there is a MOS which works jointly with the MEA, HRD and Home Ministry as a Nodal Ministry for Foreign students in India and works together with the States where African and other countries’ students come for studies.  That would send a better message than verbose political statements or silence of the opposition leaders ( because it is a Congress ruled state).

I just wish wiser counsel and peace prevails and the treatment to foreign students improves.

Transparency International Newsletter I subscribe.

4 February 2016

Today’s top story

Malaysia: France opens probe into ‘bribery’ of Malaysia’s Najib Razak
Financial Times

Paris prosecutors have launched a formal investigation into whether Najib Razak, Malaysia’s prime minister, was paid bribes over a long-contentious $1.2bn arms deal when he was defence minister.

More news

Blogs and opinion

News from Transparency International

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Ministry-wise PIB releases

What is a Sycophant?

TERM OF THE DAY FEBRUARY 3, 2016
sycophant
f   t
Someone who tries to get what they want, or earn someone’s respect, by using flattery on those people who would be able to influence their goals. The term sycophant has a negative connotation, because the person does not attempt to achieve their goals through hard work or sincerity.
Read more

 

USAGE EXAMPLE
The sycophant paid his manager compliment after compliment, hoping to gain access to an elite social society inner circle.

Ministry-wise PIB releases

 

What a Hilarious story! Sharing from FB – great learning

Sharing a story I saw on FB today – Hilarious, has message and learnings.Sharing a story I saw on FB today – Hilarious, has message and learnings.

Qiu Qing-he with Khalid Mv.

June 5, 2013 · 

During a robbery in Guangzhou, China, the bank robber shouted to everyone in the bank:

“Don’t move. The money belongs to the State. Your life belongs to you.”

Everyone in the bank laid down quietly. This is called “Mind Changing Concept” Changing 

the conventional way of thinking.

When a lady lay on the table provocatively, the robber shouted at her: “Please be civilized!

This is a robbery and not a rape!”

This is called “Being Professional” Focus only on what you are trained to do!

When the bank robbers returned home, the younger robber (MBA-trained) told the older

robber (who has only completed Year 6 in primary school): “Big brother, let’s count how

much we got.”

The older robber rebutted and said: “You are very stupid. There is so much money it will

take us a long time to count. Tonight, the TV news will tell us how much we robbed from

the bank!”

This is called “Experience.” Nowadays, experience is more important than paper

qualifications!

After the robbers had left, the bank manager told the bank supervisor to call the police

quickly. But the supervisor said to him: “Wait! Let us take out $10 million from the bank for

ourselves and add it to the $70 million that we have previously embezzled from the bank”.

This is called “Swim with the tide.” Converting an unfavorable situation to your advantage!

The supervisor says: “It will be good if there is a robbery every month.”

This is called “Killing Boredom.” Personal Happiness is more important than your job.

The next day, the TV news reported that $100 million was taken from the bank. The robbers

counted and counted and counted, but they could only count $20 million. The robbers

were very angry and complained: “We risked our lives and only took $20 million. The bank

manager took $80 million with a snap of his fingers. It looks like it is better to be educated

than to be a thief!”

This is called “Knowledge is worth as much as gold!”

The bank manager was smiling and happy because his losses in the share market are now

covered by this robbery.

This is called “Seizing the opportunity.” Daring to take risks!

So who are the real robbers here?

10 Forgotten Facts About The World’s Most Infamous Terrorist – Listverse

via 10 Forgotten Facts About The World’s Most Infamous Terrorist – Listverse.

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Transparency International Newsletter I subscribe to.

2 February 2016

Today’s top story

Nigeria: The $20-billion hole in Africa’s largest economy
The Economist (TI mention)

Most Nigerians live in poverty. Millions would be spared if officials stopped pilfering from the public purse.

More news

Multimedia of the week

Blogs and opinion

Global: The wages of sin
The Economist (TI mention)

News from Transparency International

Here’s what fruits and vegetables looked like before we domesticated them – ScienceAlert

via Here’s what fruits and vegetables looked like before we domesticated them – ScienceAlert.

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Did you see this…

Modified Sayings by Dan_Parke™

I read somewhere “C program run. C program crash. C programmer quit”

Dan_Parke™ modifies – Executives in C Suite Run, C Suites Crash, CEOs call it Quits! ”

:) :)

Did you see this before

May be not,,…

A bartender is just a pharmacist with a limited inventory so is a Coach who is like a Librarian with only 4 -5 books in his Library.

I just modified under my Pen Name DanParke™ .  No Copy Right claimed – use it when and how you wish to :)

10 Real Supervillain Plots That Governments Actually Tried – Listverse

via 10 Real Supervillain Plots That Governments Actually Tried – Listverse.

C SUITE COLLECTIVE NEWSLETTER

Your C-Suite Collective Newsletter for January 28, 2016

— Top and trending company news, curated just for you. —

TRENDING NOW

What are you doing to ensure you continue to grow and develop as a leader?

Network Curator in E V E N T S 6 days agoWhat are you doing to ensure you continue to grow and develop as a leader?   View

What is one of the biggest problems your company faces and how do you plan to address it?

Thomas White in E V E N T S 6 days agoWhat is one of the biggest problems your company faces and how do you plan to address it? View

How to Increase Trust and Engagement in Your Remote Workers

Network Curator in N E W S 2 weeks agovia Inc.com   IMAGE: Getty Images       Telecommuting is now an indelible part of the workplace. The question is no longer ifyou’ll be part of a remote team, it’s how to make that team as effective, and connected, as possible. Creating a successful remote workforce takes much more than shipping a laptop out of company headquarters. It starts …Read More

Why One Company Sets Employees Up On Blind Dates

Network Curator in N E W S 1 week agoFast Company   Inter-office dating may be frowned upon in some companies, but one Toronto-based accounting company, FreshBooks, says it’s achieved success by setting up employees on blind dates. The dates aren’t of the romantic sort, but rather, are coffee or lunch dates with randomly selected people from different teams who rarely have a chance …Read More

Where do you see your department/ your company in five years?

Network Curator in E V E N T S 4 days agoWhere do you see your department/ your company in five years? View

Want to Be an Outstanding Leader? Keep a Journal

Network Curator in N E W S 7 days agovia HBR FROM THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY Research has documented that outstanding leaders take time to reflect. Their success depends on the ability to access their unique perspective and bring it to their decisions and sense-making every day. Extraordinary leadership is rooted in several capabilities: seeing before others see, understanding …Read More

How South Africa Built a Booming Wine Business

Thomas White in N E W S 7 days agovia Entrepreneur   Nelson Mandela, the South African anti-apartheid revolutionary, politician, and philanthropist said, “After climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb.” The South African economy has climbed many hills.  Even today, with mining as the main economic driver, the Rand is very weak. So maybe it’s …Read More

Product Spotlight 4C by Lance Neuhauser

Network Curator in C-Suite Conference November 1-3, 2015 6 days agoProduct Spotlight 4C by Lance Neushauser View

TIPS AND TRICKS

Poll your Colleagues

Do you want to know what your colleagues think about something? Create a poll in the group, space, or project you would like people to find the poll in. After you post your question and the possible answers, your poll will show up for other people to vote on.

Find out more.

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Ministry-wise PIB releases

Ministry-wise PIB releases

10 Fascinating Experimental Aircraft Of World War II – Listverse

via 10 Fascinating Experimental Aircraft Of World War II – Listverse.

Defamation

TERM OF THE DAY JANUARY 26, 2016
defamation
f   t
Making of false, derogatory statement(s) in private or public about a person’s business practices, character, financial status, morals, orreputation. Oral defamation is a slander whereas printed or published defamation is a libel. The plaintiff must prove that the defamation was communicated to someone other than him or her. And, if the statement is not obviously defamatory, it must be shown … Read more

 

USAGE EXAMPLE
The employee had sued his former employer for defamation of character when he claimed that he was given several bad references after termination by his employer.

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Cartel hoarding dal stocks abroad to jack up prices: IB – Times of India

via Cartel hoarding dal stocks abroad to jack up prices: IB – Times of India.

Counter-Intelligence agencies for Market Intelligence.  But this is essential in India where elections can be won or lost with the hoarding of Common Man’s essential items like Onions, Potatoes, Tomatoes Or Lentils like Arhar or Masoor.

 

Cartel hoarding dal stocks abroad to jack up prices: IB

| TNN | Jan 26, 2016, 04.34 AM IST

The consumer affairs ministry has already approached the Delhi police to investigate the role of traders in the dramatic rise in arhar prices.The consumer affairs ministry has already approached the Delhi police to investigate the role of traders in th… Read More
NEW DELHI: The Intelligence Bureau (IB) has alerted the government about importers of pulses resorting to cartels to make a killing this year on red lentils (masoor). The report has named companies that are buying masoor in large quantities and cornering stocks in Canada, which is the largest exporter of red lentils to India.

According to rough estimates, last year dal importers had reportedly made around Rs 3,500 crore by creating acute shortages and jacking up prices of arhar. The consumer affairs ministry has already approached the Delhi police to investigate the role of traders in the dramatic rise in arhar prices.

In fact, most of the 1.3 lakh tonnes of pulses seized in recent months were shipped around April-May, when prices were close to Rs 100 a kg, and were kept in warehouses,mostly in Maharashtra. Sources said the IB referred its report to the Centre earlier this month on the cartels’ plan to raise prices of masoor. It has mentioned that the most important cartel in this sector is allegedly led by an Indian commodity trading firm along with other Indian and international players in the field.

Top Comment

Why don’t the govt just lock up the hoarders to teach all of them a lesson??! So long as these people don’t get a bamboo… Read MoreAdhiraj

The report says the plan includes amassing stocks in Canada by offering prices higher than those prevailing there and delaying the lifting of stocks from the Mumbai port, thereby causing an upward trend in satta (futures).

The IB has said the Indian firm with the most important cartel is allegedly buying masoor at Rs 1,200-Rs 1,500 a quintal more than the prevailing prices in Canada. The IB agency has also reported that a leading global supplier of African agricultural products, has allegedly parked thousands of tonnes of masoor and yellow peas in Dubai.

“While steps must be taken to ensure that traders don’t exploit the situation, we must also realise how the traders are a hundred steps ahead of us. They have better assessment of the likely harvest and map the potential country where the produce is available. They buy most of the produce by the time we start planning,” said an official, adding that the cartels are in operation since there are only a few players in import of pulses.

Mission Statement

TERM OF THE DAY JANUARY 25, 2016
mission statement
f   t

A written declaration of an organization’s core purpose and focus that normally remains unchanged over time. Properly crafted missionstatements (1) serve as filters to separate what is important from what is not, (2) clearly state which markets will be served and how, and (3) communicate a sense of intended direction to the entire organization.

A mission is different from a vision in that … Read more

 

USAGE EXAMPLE
The mission statement of the business was very clear and important to all employees and they will benefit from the direction of the company moving forward.

Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day :)

Did you know…

… that today is Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day? Feeling a little stressed lately? Then today is your day because it’s Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day! And as everyone who’s ever come in contact with it knows, bubble wrap is not just a protective wrapping for things. It is also a wonderful stress reliever! Just squeeze the bubbles and feel that stress disappear with each POP…POP…POP. So, grab a piece of bubble wrap today, and go to town! ;-)

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“My theory on housework is, if the item doesn’t multiply, smell, catch fire, or block the refrigerator door, let it be. No one else cares. Why should you?”

— Erma Bombeck

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day :)

Did you know…

… that today is Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day? Feeling a little stressed lately? Then today is your day because it’s Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day! And as everyone who’s ever come in contact with it knows, bubble wrap is not just a protective wrapping for things. It is also a wonderful stress reliever! Just squeeze the bubbles and feel that stress disappear with each POP…POP…POP. So, grab a piece of bubble wrap today, and go to town! ;-)

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“My theory on housework is, if the item doesn’t multiply, smell, catch fire, or block the refrigerator door, let it be. No one else cares. Why should you?”

— Erma Bombeck

Today is Compliment Day.

Did you know…

… that today is Compliment Day? Today is a great opportunity to say something positive about the people you come into contact with. Celebrate today by offering sincere compliments to people you know. After a long search for something good, if you just can’t find a compliment for them, then remember that silence is golden. ;-)

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“Constant kindness can accomplish much. As the sun makes ice melt, kindness causes misunderstanding, mistrust, and hostility to evaporate.”

— Albert Schweitzer

10 Hilarious Photoshopped BJP Publicity Pictures

via 10 Hilarious Photoshopped BJP Publicity Pictures.

Today is Compliment Day.

Did you know…

… that today is Compliment Day? Today is a great opportunity to say something positive about the people you come into contact with. Celebrate today by offering sincere compliments to people you know. After a long search for something good, if you just can’t find a compliment for them, then remember that silence is golden. ;-)

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“Constant kindness can accomplish much. As the sun makes ice melt, kindness causes misunderstanding, mistrust, and hostility to evaporate.”

— Albert Schweitzer

Netaji files declassified – The Times of India

Digital version of these files are available at http://netajipapers.gov.in/

via Netaji files declassified – The Times of India.

TERM OF THE DAY integrity

TERM OF THE DAY JANUARY 22, 2016
integrity
f   t
1. Strict adherence to a moral code, reflected in transparent honesty and complete harmony in what one thinks, says, and does.
2. State of a system where it is performing its intended functions without being degraded or impaired by changes or disruptions in its internal or external environments.
3. Stored or transmitted data that is free from any unauthorized change. See also data integrity.
Read more

 

USAGE EXAMPLE
I would question the integrity of the company CEO if I happened to find out that he discriminated against women.

Modi may bet on old faces and new to regain winning ways; Jaitley may move to Defence | Latest News

via Modi may bet on old faces and new to regain winning ways; Jaitley may move to Defence | Latest News .

ReUse, Recycle, Re Structure, Resize, ReShuffle – the 5 R’s of HR’s old Mantras :) when you have a nearly non-functional government which has failed people’s expectations by their Dramas and Jumlabazi :) – the Recipe’ for the PM is the Reshuffle the cabinet.

He would find it hard to let go of the Non-Performers, Loudmouths, MotorMouths, DramaBaaz ministers.

Also he would find it hard to let go of the Hardcore elements backed by Swami R and other Babas and Gurus.

He may have to accomodate a few to stem rebellion (or storm in the Coffee cup) by the old guard Mentors who stir the pot regularly.  :)

Shadow file under RTI – RTI INDIA

Home > Court Decisions > CIC Decisions > Shadow file under RTI

Shadow file under RTI
Posted on January 22, 2016
In a recent decision, Central Information Commission directed the Public Information Officer (PIO) to provide certified copy of the Shadow file under RTI. This issue was discussed in the discussions here “Shadow files in Government“. As per the Manual of Office Procedure of Government of India: “If the reference seeks an opinion, ruling-or concurrence of the receiving Department and requires detailed examination, such examination will normally be done separately and only the officer responsible for commenting upon the reference will record the final views on the file. This separate examination can be done through routine notes or on what is commonly known as “shadow files“‘ which are opened subject wise in the receiving department.”

In the discussion it was raised that “The Main file is available under RTI, but the shadow file is not revealed. Has anybody got the copies of the shadow file under RTI? If one gets to access the shadow file, which generally contains a lot more information than what main file would contain, the level of transparency shall improve…“

Shadow file under RTI

In this decision of the CIC where the PIO could not find the original file, and in turn produced ‘Shadow file’ in front of the CIC, a certified true copy of the shadow file was allowed. The decision can be read here!

via Shadow file under RTI – RTI INDIA.

Term of the Day – Economies of Scale

TERM OF THE DAY JANUARY 21, 2016
economies of scale
f   t
The reduction in long-run average and marginal costs arising from an increase in size of an operating unit (a factory or plant, for example).economics of scale can be internal to an organization (cost reduction due to technological and management factors) or external (cost reduction due to the effect of technology in an industry). See also diseconomies of scale.
Read more

 

USAGE EXAMPLE
Big companies are often more profitable than smaller ones because ofeconomies of scale: suppliers may offer discounts for larger orders, shippers may decrease per trip costs to compete for a large volume of business, and necessary production management staff may increase internal manufacturing efficiency.

 

TERM OF THE DAY JANUARY 21, 2016
economies of scale
f   t
The reduction in long-run average and marginal costs arising from an increase in size of an operating unit (a factory or plant, for example).economics of scale can be internal to an organization (cost reduction due to technological and management factors) or external (cost reduction due to the effect of technology in an industry). See also diseconomies of scale.
Read more

 

USAGE EXAMPLE
Big companies are often more profitable than smaller ones because of economies of scale: suppliers may offer discounts for larger orders, shippers may decrease per trip costs to compete for a large volume of business, and necessary production management staff may increase internal manufacturing efficiency.
The more I think about it – it seems businesses do not wish to talk about Economies of Scale. The Mobile Users have touched a Billion user mark in India but have the call rates or data rates been reduced?  No.  A friendly Government and an inert regulator ensures that !
Sure, Profit is not a Bad word but excessive profit is called Profiteering and this should be treated like Black Money generation and punished.
If not, Of course, the customers wake up – rather late. Start movements – even though under the false belief that they are the Kings :) and suffer.

CATO- The Newsletter I subscribe and recommend

Cato Weekly Dispatch
January 21, 2016

On Free Trade and the Never-Ending Copyrights

Free trade agreements can knock down protectionist barriers to human flourishing. But they can also enshrine cronyism and rent-seeking, harming consumers across the globe.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership will require governments to protect copyrights for 70 years after an author’s death, so that generations from now people in some of the poorest places on earth won’t be able to watch very old movies unless they pay royalties to the creator’s grandchildren’s grandchildren!

So much of what we do online every day—posting a meme, reviewing a book, or even just using a search engine—relies on an exception to copyright protection known as fair use. The TPP is the first trade agreement to include a provision calling on members to achieve an appropriate balance in their copyright laws through limitations and exceptions to exclusive rights. That’s a big step in the right direction.

Does Anyone Still Care About the National Debt?

According to the Congressional Budget Office’s newest estimates, the deficit is already rising again, and will exceed $544 billion this year. By 2022, just six years from now, we will once again be experiencing trillion-dollar deficits every year. Interest on the debt was projected to reach $261 billion this year, and exceed $500 billion by 2020 even before factoring in the recent budget-busting deals.

Yet, “the deficit” was mentioned an average of two times in the first five televised Republican debates (including the “undercard” debates) by all the candidates — and the moderators — combined. “The national debt” was brought up an average of 6.5 times. In the last Republican debate, there was precisely one question on the debt — and the candidates answered it by talking about their tax plans.

“One might think that was worth talking about,” writes Cato senior fellow Michael D. Tanner. “So far in this campaign, one would apparently be wrong.”

Save the Date: Cato University 2016

Cato University is the Cato Institute’s premier educational event of the year. This annual program brings together outstanding faculty and participants from across the country and, often, from around the globe–all sharing a commitment to liberty and learning. Its widening popularity is due to not only the quality of the attendees, faculty and topics, but the opportunity it provides participants to form new and enduring friendships, and for sharing experiences and perspective in a one-of-a-kind, brain-energizing environment.

Would you like to meet like-minded people from all over? Have a spectacular vacation while sharing ideas on how to advance, enhance, and defend your principles about liberty, free markets, individual rights, the dangers of a sprawling, expensive, and intruding government – among other subjects? If so, Cato University is definitely for you.

Cato University 2016 will be held on July 24 – 29, 2016 at the Cato Institute, located in the heart of Washington, D.C.

Cato Institute Multimedia Highlights

#Cato2016: Ongoing Coverage of Campaign 2016

Throughout the 2016 campaign session, Cato Institute scholars will be providing a libertarian perspective using the Twitter hashtag #Cato2016.

On Thursday, January 28th, at 9:00 p.m. Fox News will host will host a nationally-televised debate featuring candidates for the GOP nomination for the 2016 presidential elections.

Cato scholars will be live-tweeting the debate, bringing insightful commentary and hard-hitting policy analysis to the discussion.

Support Cato

Cato Institute

1000 Massachusetts Ave, NW,
Washington, DC 20001-5403
Phone (202) 842 0200

parkhe@gmail.comwhy did I get this email?  

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Ministry-wise PIB releases

My C-Suite Collective Newsletter for January 21, 2016

Your C-Suite Collective Newsletter for January 21, 2016

— Top and trending company news, curated just for you. —

TRENDING NOW

What advice would you give someone going into a leadership position for the first time?

Thomas White in E V E N T S 5 days agoWhat advice would you give someone going into a leadership position for the first time? View

Empathy in the Workplace with Deidre Koppelman, Founder and CEO of PEAR Core Solutions

Network Curator in N E W S 7 days agoEmpathy in the Workplace with Deidre Koppelman NEXT THURSDAY January 21st at 1PM EST Registration If there was one word, one action, that could convert your entire business into a place where employees were engaged, clients were happy to do business with you (and they referred you business) and your biggest challenge was growth in sales and it …Read More

How the Recession Affected Entrepreneur Financing In the Best Way Possible

Thomas White in N E W S 7 days agovia Entrepreneur Image credit: Shutterstock   If the Gilt Groupe’s acquisition by Saks Fifth Avenue teaches us anything, it’s this: the Great Recession isn’t done with the U.S. economy just yet. For the unfamiliar, the Gilt Groupe was a dominant fashion flash sale company launched in the middle of the recession, when manufacturers and retailers …Read More

How Marketers Use Fear Of Chemicals For Profit: 3 Easy Steps

Network Curator in N E W S 6 days agovia Forbes   Just this past October The Environmental Working Group, an NGO best known for its annual list of “Dirty Dozen” fruits and veggies that they advise choosing organic to avoid pesticide residues, launched its “EWG Verified” program. Based on its “Skin Deep Cosmetics Database,” which combines product ingredient lists with toxicity and …Read More

Why (And How) You Should Be A Data-Driven CFO

Thomas White in N E W S 6 days agovia IBM estimates the world generates 2.5 quintillion bytes of data every day, and, amazingly, 90 percent of the world’s data was created in the last two years alone. How can CFOs be expected to make sense of this onslaught of information? In its recent CFO Indicator report, Adaptive Insights found CFOs expect this “data deluge” to continue over …Read More

Cure Yourself Of Stage Fright In 2016 With These Three Simple Steps

Network Curator in N E W S 7 days agoIf stage fright makes your life miserable before, during, and even after a speech, then it’s time to make 2016 the year you banish this demon once and for all. First of all, don’t make the mistake of thinking that you have it worse than everyone else, or that speaker that you admire is lucky because she doesn’t get stage fright. Everyone gets …Read More

How to Increase Trust and Engagement in Your Remote Workers

Network Curator in N E W S 5 days agovia Inc.com   IMAGE: Getty Images       Telecommuting is now an indelible part of the workplace. The question is no longer ifyou’ll be part of a remote team, it’s how to make that team as effective, and connected, as possible. Creating a successful remote workforce takes much more than shipping a laptop out of company headquarters. It starts …Read More

How many of these books have you read?

Donna Mitsos in T H I N K T A N K 2 weeks agoFollowing is a link to a list of fifteen billionaires and their favorite books…. Warren Buffett Books How many have you read? I am only at five….I have a lot of reading to do. View

TIPS AND TRICKS

Get More from Meetings

Want to get more out of your meetings? Use C-Suite Collective to take meeting notes while the meeting is going on. Other people can chime in with their own notes, and you’ve got a shared record of what happened. Or, post a discussion and mark it as a question and avoid even booking a physical meeting.

You can create tasks for any action items. For recurring meetings you can use a Project to organize all the meeting notes and action item tasks in one place.

Find out more.

Put C-Suite Collective in your pocket! Get Jive for iOS or Jive for Android.

Penalty only if applicant proves mala fide intent of PIO – RTI INDIA

Home > Court Decisions > CIC Decisions > Penalty only if applicant proves mala fide intent of PIO

Penalty only if applicant proves mala fide intent of PIO
Posted on January 21, 2016
Although the information was not provided within the stipulated time, it cannot be said that the CPIO acted consciously and deliberately with intent to deny the information sought by the appellant and thus CIC refused to initiate penalty procedure under Section 20(1) of the RTI Act.

CIC instead has quoted High Court judgement for not initiating penalty procedure.

Penalty only if applicant proves mala fide intent of PIO

In WP(C) 3114/2007 Bhagat Singh Vs. CIC

via Penalty only if applicant proves mala fide intent of PIO – RTI INDIA.

Did you know

Did you know…

… that today is Nautilus Launch Day? The Nautilus, the first atomic-powered submarine, was launched in Groton, Connecticut, on this day in 1954. First Lady Mamie Eisenhower christened the vessel with a bottle of champagne. Trivia fans: Just before the first lady christened the boat, an Electric Boat shipyard worker high on a girder called out, “Hit it good and hard, Mrs. Eisenhower.”

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“Be nice to each other. You can make a whole day a different day for everybody.”

— Richard Dawson

Did you know

Did you know…

… that today is Nautilus Launch Day? The Nautilus, the first atomic-powered submarine, was launched in Groton, Connecticut, on this day in 1954. First Lady Mamie Eisenhower christened the vessel with a bottle of champagne. Trivia fans: Just before the first lady christened the boat, an Electric Boat shipyard worker high on a girder called out, “Hit it good and hard, Mrs. Eisenhower.”

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“Be nice to each other. You can make a whole day a different day for everybody.”

— Richard Dawson

Travis Kalanick’s Uber tip: If you don’t have the hustle in you, get a co-founder who does

via Travis Kalanick’s Uber tip: If you don’t have the hustle in you, get a co-founder who does.

” Jugaading” is becoming famous! Jugaad after all, has no IP protection :) :) :)

U.S. Materials Marketplace Wins Prestigious “Circulars” Award at World Economic Forum Annual Meeting

via U.S. Materials Marketplace Wins Prestigious “Circulars” Award at World Economic Forum Annual Meeting.

Penalty only if applicant proves mala fide intent of PIO – RTI INDIA

Penalty only if applicant proves mala fide intent of PIO
Posted on January 21, 2016
Although the information was not provided within the stipulated time, it cannot be said that the CPIO acted consciously and deliberately with intent to deny the information sought by the appellant and thus CIC refused to initiate penalty procedure under Section 20(1) of the RTI Act.

CIC instead has quoted High Court judgement for not initiating penalty procedure.

Penalty only if applicant proves mala fide intent of PIO

In WP(C) 3114/2007 Bhagat Singh Vs. CIC

via Penalty only if applicant proves mala fide intent of PIO – RTI INDIA.

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Did you know

Did you know… 
… that today is Wikipedia’s Birthday? In 2001, Wikipedia, a free-access, free-content Internet encyclopedia, was launched by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger. The English language Wikipedia is now one of 291 Wikipedia editions and is the largest with 5,051,481 articles. There is a grand total, including all Wikipedias, of over 37 million articles in over 250 different languages! Happy birthday, Wikipedia! 
~~~ 
Today’s Inspirational Quote: 
“To know that we know what we know, and to know that we do not know what we do not know, that is true knowledge.” 
— Nicolaus Copernicus 

 

Ministry-wise PIB releases

Ministry-wise PIB releases

India moving from BS IV to VI – TOI report

Government has advanced the date when new standard for cleaner auto fuel kicks in, aiming to leapfrog to BS-VI norms by April 2020. Here are 10 things you should know:

I love painting Light houses and Sea.

Lighthouse
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other uses, see Lighthouse (disambiguation).

The lighthouse of Aveiro, west coast of Portugal
File:Roman Rock Lighthouse.webm
Aerial footage of the Roman Rock Lighthouse off the southern coast of South Africa.
A lighthouse is a tower, building, or other type of structure designed to emit light from a system of lamps and lenses and used as a navigational aid for maritime pilots at sea or on inland waterways.
Lighthouses mark dangerous coastlines, hazardous shoals, reefs, safe entries to harbors, and can also assist in aerial navigation. Once widely used, the number of operational lighthouses has declined due to the expense of maintenance and use of electronic navigational systems.
Contents [hide]
1 History
1.1 Ancient lighthouses
1.2 Modern construction
1.3 Lighting improvements
1.4 Optical systems
1.5 Recent
1.6 Famous lighthouse builders
2 Lighthouse technology
2.1 Power
2.2 Lens
2.3 Light characteristics
3 Building
3.1 Design
3.2 Components
3.3 Range lights
4 Maintenance
5 Preservation
6 Popular culture and symbolism
6.1 Heraldry
7 Gallery
8 See also
9 References
10 External links
History[edit]
Main article: History of lighthouses
Ancient lighthouses[edit]

Graphic reconstruction of the Pharos according to a 2006 study
Before the development of clearly defined ports, mariners were guided by fires built on hilltops. Since raising the fire would improve the visibility, placing the fire on a platform became a practice that led to the development of the lighthouse. In antiquity, the lighthouse functioned more as an entrance marker to ports than as a warning signal for reefs and promontories, unlike many modern lighthouses. The most famous lighthouse structure from antiquity was the Pharos of Alexandria, although it collapsed during an earthquake centuries later.
The intact Tower of Hercules at A Coruña, Spain gives insight into ancient lighthouse construction; other evidence about lighthouses exists in depictions on coins and mosaics, of which many represent the lighthouse at Ostia. Coins from Alexandria, Ostia, and Laodicea in Syria also exist.
Modern construction[edit]
The modern era of lighthouses began at the turn of the 18th century, as lighthouse construction boomed in lockstep with burgeoning levels of transatlantic commerce. Advances in structural engineering and new and efficient lighting equipment allowed for the creation of larger and more powerful lighthouses, including ones exposed to the sea. The function of lighthouses shifted toward the provision of a visible warning against shipping hazards, such as rocks or reefs.

Winstanley’s lighthouse at the Eddystone Rocks marked the beginning in a new phase of lighthouse development.
The Eddystone Rocks were a major shipwreck hazard for mariners sailing through the English Channel.[1] The first lighthouse built there was an octagonal wooden structure, anchored by 12 iron stanchions secured in the rock, and was built by Henry Winstanley from 1696 to 1698. His lighthouse was the first tower in the world to have been fully exposed to the open sea.[2]
The civil engineer, John Smeaton, rebuilt the lighthouse from 1756–59;[3] his tower marked a major step forward in the design of lighthouses and remained in use until 1877. He modelled the shape of his lighthouse on that of an oak tree, using granite blocks. He pioneered the use of “hydraulic lime,” a form of concrete that will set under water, and developed a technique of securing the granite blocks together using dovetail joints and marble dowels.[4] The dovetailing feature served to improve the structural stability, although Smeaton also had to taper the thickness of the tower towards the top, for which he curved the tower inwards on a gentle gradient. This profile had the added advantage of allowing some of the energy of the waves to dissipate on impact with the walls. His lighthouse was the prototype for the modern lighthouse and influenced all subsequent engineers.[5]

John Smeaton’s rebuilt version of the Eddystone Lighthouse, 1759. This represented a great step forward in lighthouse design.
One such influence was Robert Stevenson, himself a seminal figure in the development of lighthouse design and construction.[6] His greatest achievement was the construction of the Bell Rock Lighthouse in 1810, one of the most impressive feats of engineering of the age. This structure was based upon Smeaton’s design, but with several improved features, such as the incorporation of rotating lights, alternating between red and white.[7] Stevenson worked for the Northern Lighthouse Board for nearly fifty years[6] during which time he designed and oversaw the construction and later improvement of numerous lighthouses. He innovated in the choice of light sources, mountings, reflector design, the use of Fresnel lenses, and in rotation and shuttering systems providing lighthouses with individual signatures allowing them to be identified by seafarers. He also invented the movable jib and the balance crane as a necessary part for lighthouse construction.
Alexander Mitchell designed the first screw-pile lighthouse – his lighthouse was built on piles that were screwed into the sandy or muddy seabed. Construction of his design began in 1838 at the mouth of the Thames and was known as the Maplin Sands lighthouse, and first lit in 1841.[8] Although its construction began later, the Wyre Light in Fleetwood, Lancashire, was the first to be lit (in 1840).[8]
Lighting improvements[edit]

Argand lamp with circular wick and glass chimney. (Illustration from Les Merveilles de la science [1867–1869] by Louis Figuier.)
The source of illumination had generally been wood pyres or burning coal. The Argand lamp, invented in 1782 by the Swiss scientist, Aimé Argand, revolutionized lighthouse illumination with its steady smokeless flame. Early models used ground glass which was sometimes tinted around the wick. Later models used a mantle of thorium dioxide suspended over the flame, creating a bright, steady light.[9] The Argand lamp used whale oil, colza, olive oil[10] or other vegetable oil as fuel which was supplied by a gravity feed from a reservoir mounted above the burner. The lamp was first produced by Matthew Boulton, in partnership with Argand, in 1784 and became the standard for lighthouses for over a century.
South Foreland Lighthouse was the first tower to successfully use an electric light in 1875. The lighthouse’s carbon arc lamps were powered by a steam-driven magneto.[11] John Richardson Wigham was the first to develop a system for gas illumination of lighthouses. His improved gas ‘crocus’ burner at the Baily Lighthouse near Dublin was 13 times more powerful than the most brilliant light then known.[12]
The vaporized oil burner was invented in 1901 by Arthur Kitson, and improved by David Hood at Trinity House. The fuel was vaporized at high pressure and burned to heat the mantle, giving an output of over six times the luminosity of traditional oil lights. The use of gas as illuminant became widely available with the invention of the Dalén light by Swedish engineer, Gustaf Dalén. He used Agamassan (Aga), a substrate, to absorb the gas allowing safe storage and hence commercial exploitation. Dalén also invented the ‘sun valve’, which automatically regulated the light and turned it off during the daytime. The technology was the predominant form of light source in lighthouses from the 1900s through the 1960s, when electric lighting had become dominant.[13]
Optical systems[edit]

Diagram depicting how a spherical Fresnel lens collimates light
With the development of the steady illumination of the Argand lamp, the application of optical lenses to increase and focus the light intensity became a practical possibility. William Hutchinson developed the first practical optical system in 1763, known as a catoptric system. This rudimentary system effectively collimated the emitted light into a concentrated beam, thereby greatly increasing the light’s visibility.[14] The ability to focus the light led to the first revolving lighthouse beams, where the light would appear to the mariners as a series of intermittent flashes. It also became possible to transmit complex signals using the light flashes.
French physicist and engineer Augustin-Jean Fresnel developed the multi-part Fresnel lens for use in lighthouses. His design allowed for the construction of lenses of large aperture and short focal length, without the mass and volume of material that would be required by a lens of conventional design. A Fresnel lens can be made much thinner than a comparable conventional lens, in some cases taking the form of a flat sheet. A Fresnel lens can also capture more oblique light from a light source, thus allowing the light from a lighthouse equipped with one, to be visible over greater distances.
The first Fresnel lens was used in 1823 in the Cordouan lighthouse at the mouth of the Gironde estuary; its light could be seen from more than 20 miles (32 km) out.[15] Fresnel’s invention increased the luminosity of the lighthouse lamp by a factor of 4 and his system is still in common use.
Recent[edit]
The advent of electrification, and automatic lamp changers began to make lighthouse keepers obsolete. For many years, lighthouses still had keepers, partly because lighthouse keepers could serve as a rescue service if necessary. Improvements in maritime navigation and safety such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) have led to the phasing out of non-automated lighthouses across the world.[16] In Canada, this trend has been stopped and there are still 50 staffed light stations, with 27 on the west coast alone.[17]
Remaining modern lighthouses are more functional and less picturesque; usually they use solar-charged batteries and have a single stationary flashing light sitting on a steel skeleton tower.[18]
Famous lighthouse builders[edit]

Sir James Douglass was a prolific lighthouse builder and designer in the late 19th century.
John Smeaton is noteworthy for having designed the third and most famous Eddystone Lighthouse but some builders are well known for their work in building multiple lighthouses. The Stevenson family (Robert, Alan, David, Thomas, David Alan, and Charles) made lighthouse building a three generation profession in Scotland. Irishman Alexander Mitchell invented and built a number of screwpile lighthouses despite his blindness. Englishman James Douglass was knighted for his work on lighthouses.
United States Army Corps of Engineers Lieutenant George Meade built numerous lighthouses along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts before gaining wider fame as the winning general at the Battle of Gettysburg. Colonel Orlando M. Poe, engineer to General William Tecumseh Sherman in the Siege of Atlanta, designed and built some of the most exotic lighthouses in the most difficult locations on the U.S. Great Lakes.[19]
French merchant navy officer Marius Michel Pasha built almost a hundred lighthouses along the coasts of the Ottoman Empire in a period of twenty years after the Crimean War (1853–1856).[20]
Lighthouse technology[edit]
Power[edit]
In a lighthouse, the source of light is called the “lamp” (whether electric or fueled by oil) and the concentration of the light is by the “lens” or “optic”. Originally lit by open fires and later candles, the Argand hollow wick lamp and parabolic reflector were introduced in the late 18th century.
Whale oil was also used with wicks as the source of light. Kerosene became popular in the 1870s and electricity and carbide (acetylene gas) began replacing kerosene around the turn of the 20th century.[18] Carbide was promoted by the Dalén light which automatically lit the lamp at nightfall and extinguished it at dawn.
Lens[edit]
See also: Fresnel lens

Cape Meares Lighthouse; first-order Fresnel lens
Before modern strobe lights, lenses were used to concentrate the light from a continuous source. Vertical light rays of the lamp are redirected into a horizontal plane, and horizontally the light is focused into one or a few directions at a time, with the light beam swept around. As a result, in addition to seeing the side of the light beam, the light is directly visible from greater distances, and with an identifying light characteristic.
This concentration of light is accomplished with a rotating lens assembly. In early lighthouses, the light source was a kerosene lamp or, earlier, an animal or vegetable oil Argand lamp, and the lenses rotated by a weight driven clockwork assembly wound by lighthouse keepers, sometimes as often as every two hours. The lens assembly sometimes floated in liquid mercury to reduce friction. In more modern lighthouses, electric lights and motor drives were used, generally powered by diesel electric generators. These also supplied electricity for the lighthouse keepers.[18]
Efficiently concentrating the light from a large omnidirectional light source requires a very large diameter lens. This would require a very thick and heavy lens if a conventional lens were used. The Fresnel lens (pronounced /freɪˈnɛl/) focused 85% of a lamp’s light versus the 20% focused with the parabolic reflectors of the time. Its design enabled construction of lenses of large size and short focal length without the weight and volume of material in conventional lens designs.[21]
Fresnel lighthouse lenses are ranked by order, a measure of refracting power, with a first order lens being the largest, most powerful and expensive; and a sixth order lens being the smallest. The order is based on the focal length of the lens. A first order lens has the longest focal length, with the sixth being the shortest. Coastal lighthouses generally use first, second, or third order lenses, while harbor lights and beacons use fourth, fifth, or sixth order lenses.[22]
Some lighthouses, such as those at Cape Race, Newfoundland, and Makapuu Point, Hawaii, used a more powerful hyperradiant Fresnel lens manufactured by the firm of Chance Brothers.
In recent times, many Fresnel lenses have been replaced by rotating aerobeacons which require less maintenance. In modern automated lighthouses, this system of rotating lenses is often replaced by a high intensity light that emits brief omnidirectional flashes (concentrating the light in time rather than direction). These lights are similar to obstruction lights used to warn aircraft of tall structures. Recent innovations are “Vega Lights”, and initial experiments with light-emitting diode (LED) panels.[18]
Light characteristics[edit]
See also: Light characteristic
In any of these designs an observer, rather than seeing a continuous weak light, sees a brighter light during short time intervals. These instants of bright light are arranged to create a light characteristic or, pattern specific to a lighthouse.[23] For example, the Scheveningen Lighthouse flashes are alternately 2.5 and 7.5 seconds. Some lights have sectors of a particular color (usually formed by colored panes in the lantern) to distinguish safe water areas from dangerous shoals. Modern lighthouses often have unique reflectors or Racon transponders so the radar signature of the light is also unique.
Building[edit]
Design[edit]

Architect’s design of Split Rock Lighthouse

Architecture of 1909 lighthouses in Finland
For effectiveness, the lamp must be high enough to be seen before the danger is reached by a mariner. The minimum height is calculated by trigonometric formula d is 1.17 times the square root of H where H is the height above water in feet, and d is the distance to the horizon in nautical miles.[24]
Where dangerous shoals are located far off a flat sandy beach, the prototypical tall masonry coastal lighthouse is constructed to assist the navigator making a landfall after an ocean crossing. Often these are cylindrical to reduce the effect of wind on a tall structure, such as Cape May Light. Smaller versions of this design are often used as harbor lights to mark the entrance into a harbor, such as New London Harbor Light.
Where a tall cliff exists, a smaller structure may be placed on top such as at Horton Point Light. Sometimes, such a location can be too high, for example along the west coast of the United States, where frequent low clouds can obscure the light. In these cases, lighthouses are placed below clifftop to ensure that they can still be seen at the surface during periods of fog or low clouds, as at Point Reyes Lighthouse. Another victim of fog was the Old Point Loma lighthouse, which was replaced in 1891 with a lower lighthouse, New Point Loma lighthouse.
As technology advanced, prefabricated skeletal iron or steel structures tended to be used for lighthouses constructed in the 20th century. These often have a narrow cylindrical core surrounded by an open lattice work bracing, such as Finns Point Range Light.
Sometimes a lighthouse needs to be constructed in the water itself. Wave-washed lighthouses are masonry structures constructed to withstand water impact, such as Eddystone Lighthouse in Britain and the St. George Reef Light off California. In shallower bays, Screw-pile lighthouse ironwork structures are screwed into the seabed and a low wooden structure is placed above the open framework, such as Thomas Point Shoal Lighthouse. As screw piles can be disrupted by ice, steel caisson lighthouses such as Orient Point Light are used in cold climates. Orient Long Beach Bar Light (Bug Light) is a blend of a screw pile light that was converted to a caisson light because of the threat of ice damage.[25]
In waters too deep for a conventional structure, a lightship might be used instead of a lighthouse, such as the former lightship Columbia. Most of these have now been replaced by fixed light platforms (such as Ambrose Light) similar to those used for offshore oil exploration.[26]

The Light-house on Point of Air, Flintshire, 1815

Eddystone Lighthouse, one of the first wave-washed lighthouses

Hyperboloid design Adziogol Lighthouse by V.G.Shukhov, Ukraine, 1910

Kõpu Lighthouse has the shape of a square prism, with massive counterforts

Iron quadripod lighthouse from 1877 in Ruhnu island

Components[edit]

Lighthouse lantern room from mid-1800s
While lighthouse buildings differ depending on the location and purpose, they tend to have common components.
A light station comprises the lighthouse tower and all outbuildings, such as the keeper’s living quarters, fuel house, boathouse, and fog-signaling building. The Lighthouse itself consists of a tower structure supporting the lantern room where the light operates.
The lantern room is the glassed-in housing at the top of a lighthouse tower containing the lamp and lens. Its glass storm panes are supported by metal Astragal bars running vertically or diagonally. At the top of the lantern room is a stormproof ventilator designed to remove the smoke of the lamps and the heat that builds in the glass enclosure. A lightning rod and grounding system connected to the metal cupola roof provides a safe conduit for any lightning strikes.
Immediately beneath the lantern room is usually a Watch Room or Service Room where fuel and other supplies were kept and where the keeper prepared the lanterns for the night and often stood watch. The clockworks (for rotating the lenses) were also located there. On a lighthouse tower, an open platform called the gallery is often located outside the watch room (called the Main Gallery) or Lantern Room (Lantern Gallery). This was mainly used for cleaning the outside of the windows of the Lantern Room.[27]
Lighthouses near to each other that are similar in shape are often painted in a unique pattern so they can easily be recognized during daylight, a marking known as a daymark. The black and white barber pole spiral pattern of Cape Hatteras Lighthouse is one example. Race Rocks Light in western Canada is painted in horizontal black and white bands to stand out against the horizon.
Range lights[edit]
Main article: Range lights

Range Lights in Margaree Harbour, Nova Scotia. When the vessel is on the correct course, the two lights line up above one another.
Aligning two fixed points on land provides a navigator with a line of position called a range in the U.S. and a transit in Britain. Ranges can be used to precisely align a vessel within a narrow channel such as in a river. With landmarks of a range illuminated with a set of fixed lighthouses, nighttime navigation is possible.
Such paired lighthouses are called range lights in the U.S. and leading lights in the United Kingdom. The closer light is referred to as the beacon or front range; the furthest away is called the rear range. The rear range light is almost always taller than the front.
When the vessel is on the correct course, the two lights line up vertically. But when the observer is out of position, the difference in alignment indicates the proper direction of travel to correct the course.
Maintenance[edit]
In the United States, lighthouses are maintained by the United States Coast Guard (USCG).[28] Those in England and Wales are looked after by Trinity House; in Scotland, by the Northern Lighthouse Board; and in Ireland by the Commissioners of Irish Lights. In Canada, they are managed by the Canadian Coast Guard. In Australia, lighthouses are conducted by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority.
The Soviet Union built a number of automated lighthouses powered by radioisotope thermoelectric generators in remote locations. They operated for long periods without external support with great reliability.[29] However numerous installations deteriorated, were stolen, or vandalized. Some cannot be found due to poor record keeping.[30]
Preservation[edit]
As lighthouses became less essential to navigation, many of their historic structures faced demolition or neglect. In the United States, the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act of 2000 provides for the transfer of lighthouse structures to local governments and private non-profit groups, while the USCG continues to maintain the lamps and lenses. In Canada, the Nova Scotia Lighthouse Preservation Society won heritage status for Sambro Island Lighthouse, and sponsored the Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act to change Canadian federal laws to protect lighthouses.[31]
Many groups formed to restore and save lighthouses around the world. They include the World Lighthouse Society and the United States Lighthouse Society.[32] A further international group is the Amateur Radio Lighthouse Society, which sends amateur radio operators to publicize the preservation of remote lighthouses throughout the world.[33]
Popular culture and symbolism[edit]

Split Point Lighthouse, used in the popular Australian TV series Round the Twist
Visiting and photographing lighthouses are popular hobbies as is collecting ceramic replicas. Some lighthouses are popular travel destinations in their own right, and the buildings maintained as tourist attractions. In the U.S., National Lighthouse and Lightship Weekend is celebrated on the first weekend of August, and International Lighthouse and Lightship Weekend on the third weekend. Many lighthouses are open to the public and amateur radio operators communicate between them on these days.
Lighthouses are popular icons on vehicle license plates. Barnegat Lighthouse, Tuckerton Island Lighthouse, Thomas Point Shoal Light, Saybrook Breakwater Light, White Shoal Light, and Biloxi Light are so depicted.[34]
To recognize the role of lighthouse keepers in maritime safety, the U.S. Coast Guard named a class of 175-foot (53 m) coastal buoy tenders after famous U.S. lighthouse keepers. Fourteen ships in the class were built between 1996 and 2000.[35]
Due to their function as beacons of safety, organizations choose lighthouses as a symbol. The lighthouse is the symbol of Lighthouse International, a U.S. organization for the blind.[36] Lighthouses are often interpreted in dreams as beacons of truth or as male fertility and influence.
Lighthouses were once regarded as an archetypal public good, because ships could benefit from the light without being forced to pay. The Confederate States Constitution explicitly allowed public funds to be spent on navigation, including lighthouses.[37]
A widely disseminated urban legend tells of a radio conversation between a U.S. or British naval vessel and what is believed to be another ship on a collision course. The naval vessel insists the other ship change course, but the other ship continues to insist the naval vessel do so. After the captain of the naval vessel identifies himself and demands a course change, the other party responds with, “I’m a lighthouse. It’s your call”.
The Disney film Pete’s Dragon featured a lighthouse, and the resulting Helen Reddy song “Candle on the Water” alludes to it. The Australian television series Round the Twist involved a family living at Split Point Lighthouse. The long-running American soap opera Guiding Light has featured a lighthouse in many of its opening title segments, and the fictional Springfield, Illinois has a lighthouse situated near the town.[38]
Their isolated and mysterious nature makes lighthouses a frequent setting of horror and suspense films, as well as adventure video games. A lighthouse played a pivotal role in Martin Scorsese’s 2010 film Shutter Island, and was featured in the final shot of the film.
An island with a lighthouse is the setting of Tove Jansson’s novel Moominpappa at Sea and the isolated nature of the lighthouse surrounded by the sea also is a reference to the states of mind of the main characters of the novel.
St. Anthony’s Lighthouse at St. Anthony’s Head near Falmouth, Cornwall, was featured in the title sequence of the children’s live action puppet television program series Fraggle Rock created by Jim Henson.
The Adventures of Portland Bill was a British stop motion animated children’s television series made in 1983. Set in a fictional lighthouse, the name of its main character was a reference to the Portland Bill Lighthouse in Dorset. Many of the other characters were plays on the names of coastal regions, made familiar to the wider public by the BBC Radio 4 Shipping Forecast.
The Little Red Lighthouse in New York City is the hero of the 1942 children’s book The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge by Hildegarde Swift.
Heraldry[edit]
Lighthouses are used as charges in heraldry, especially for towns along the seaside.

Kreis Südtondern

Amt Südtondern

Pommerby

Bastorf

Borkum

Dahme (Holstein)

Sassnitz arms since 1959

Gallery[edit]

Tower of Hercules in A Coruña, Spain. Built by the Romans, it’s the world’s oldest lighthouse that is still in working condition.

Cabo Branco Lighthouse in João Pessoa, Brazil is a major attraction at the easternmost inland point of the Americas

A rarer type of lighthouse on stilts in the Hauraki Gulf of New Zealand. Mostly protected by nearby islands, Bean Rock lighthouse lights the way into the Waitemata Harbour.

Lighthouse “El Faro”, Maspalomas, Gran Canaria.

Lighthouse “Lobito” in Lobito, Angola

The Knarrarósviti Lighthouse is a two-staged tower, built in 1938-1939, located near the town of Stokkseyri. Iceland.

The Vypin Lighthouse at Kochi, India. The structure (built in 1979) has an unusual cross section.

The Rawley Point Lighthouse near Two Rivers, Wisconsin at Point Beach State Forest shows an example of an octagonal skeletal structure.

Baltic coast lighthouse, located in Niechorze, Poland

Peggys Point Lighthouse, Nova Scotia, Canada

Small non-attendant lighthouse at Gullringnes in Vardø, North Norway.

Keri Lighthouse in Estonia was the first lighthouse in the world to be powered by natural gas.

Suurupi front lighthouse, built in 1859, is the only working wooden lighthouse in Estonia.

Grand Island East Channel Light, a wooden lighthouse built in 1867 on Grand Island in Lake Superior, near Munising, Michigan, U.S.A.

I love painting Light houses and Sea.

Lighthouse
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other uses, see Lighthouse (disambiguation).

The lighthouse of Aveiro, west coast of Portugal
File:Roman Rock Lighthouse.webm
Aerial footage of the Roman Rock Lighthouse off the southern coast of South Africa.
A lighthouse is a tower, building, or other type of structure designed to emit light from a system of lamps and lenses and used as a navigational aid for maritime pilots at sea or on inland waterways.
Lighthouses mark dangerous coastlines, hazardous shoals, reefs, safe entries to harbors, and can also assist in aerial navigation. Once widely used, the number of operational lighthouses has declined due to the expense of maintenance and use of electronic navigational systems.
Contents [hide]
1 History
1.1 Ancient lighthouses
1.2 Modern construction
1.3 Lighting improvements
1.4 Optical systems
1.5 Recent
1.6 Famous lighthouse builders
2 Lighthouse technology
2.1 Power
2.2 Lens
2.3 Light characteristics
3 Building
3.1 Design
3.2 Components
3.3 Range lights
4 Maintenance
5 Preservation
6 Popular culture and symbolism
6.1 Heraldry
7 Gallery
8 See also
9 References
10 External links
History[edit]
Main article: History of lighthouses
Ancient lighthouses[edit]

Graphic reconstruction of the Pharos according to a 2006 study
Before the development of clearly defined ports, mariners were guided by fires built on hilltops. Since raising the fire would improve the visibility, placing the fire on a platform became a practice that led to the development of the lighthouse. In antiquity, the lighthouse functioned more as an entrance marker to ports than as a warning signal for reefs and promontories, unlike many modern lighthouses. The most famous lighthouse structure from antiquity was the Pharos of Alexandria, although it collapsed during an earthquake centuries later.
The intact Tower of Hercules at A Coruña, Spain gives insight into ancient lighthouse construction; other evidence about lighthouses exists in depictions on coins and mosaics, of which many represent the lighthouse at Ostia. Coins from Alexandria, Ostia, and Laodicea in Syria also exist.
Modern construction[edit]
The modern era of lighthouses began at the turn of the 18th century, as lighthouse construction boomed in lockstep with burgeoning levels of transatlantic commerce. Advances in structural engineering and new and efficient lighting equipment allowed for the creation of larger and more powerful lighthouses, including ones exposed to the sea. The function of lighthouses shifted toward the provision of a visible warning against shipping hazards, such as rocks or reefs.

Winstanley’s lighthouse at the Eddystone Rocks marked the beginning in a new phase of lighthouse development.
The Eddystone Rocks were a major shipwreck hazard for mariners sailing through the English Channel.[1] The first lighthouse built there was an octagonal wooden structure, anchored by 12 iron stanchions secured in the rock, and was built by Henry Winstanley from 1696 to 1698. His lighthouse was the first tower in the world to have been fully exposed to the open sea.[2]
The civil engineer, John Smeaton, rebuilt the lighthouse from 1756–59;[3] his tower marked a major step forward in the design of lighthouses and remained in use until 1877. He modelled the shape of his lighthouse on that of an oak tree, using granite blocks. He pioneered the use of “hydraulic lime,” a form of concrete that will set under water, and developed a technique of securing the granite blocks together using dovetail joints and marble dowels.[4] The dovetailing feature served to improve the structural stability, although Smeaton also had to taper the thickness of the tower towards the top, for which he curved the tower inwards on a gentle gradient. This profile had the added advantage of allowing some of the energy of the waves to dissipate on impact with the walls. His lighthouse was the prototype for the modern lighthouse and influenced all subsequent engineers.[5]

John Smeaton’s rebuilt version of the Eddystone Lighthouse, 1759. This represented a great step forward in lighthouse design.
One such influence was Robert Stevenson, himself a seminal figure in the development of lighthouse design and construction.[6] His greatest achievement was the construction of the Bell Rock Lighthouse in 1810, one of the most impressive feats of engineering of the age. This structure was based upon Smeaton’s design, but with several improved features, such as the incorporation of rotating lights, alternating between red and white.[7] Stevenson worked for the Northern Lighthouse Board for nearly fifty years[6] during which time he designed and oversaw the construction and later improvement of numerous lighthouses. He innovated in the choice of light sources, mountings, reflector design, the use of Fresnel lenses, and in rotation and shuttering systems providing lighthouses with individual signatures allowing them to be identified by seafarers. He also invented the movable jib and the balance crane as a necessary part for lighthouse construction.
Alexander Mitchell designed the first screw-pile lighthouse – his lighthouse was built on piles that were screwed into the sandy or muddy seabed. Construction of his design began in 1838 at the mouth of the Thames and was known as the Maplin Sands lighthouse, and first lit in 1841.[8] Although its construction began later, the Wyre Light in Fleetwood, Lancashire, was the first to be lit (in 1840).[8]
Lighting improvements[edit]

Argand lamp with circular wick and glass chimney. (Illustration from Les Merveilles de la science [1867–1869] by Louis Figuier.)
The source of illumination had generally been wood pyres or burning coal. The Argand lamp, invented in 1782 by the Swiss scientist, Aimé Argand, revolutionized lighthouse illumination with its steady smokeless flame. Early models used ground glass which was sometimes tinted around the wick. Later models used a mantle of thorium dioxide suspended over the flame, creating a bright, steady light.[9] The Argand lamp used whale oil, colza, olive oil[10] or other vegetable oil as fuel which was supplied by a gravity feed from a reservoir mounted above the burner. The lamp was first produced by Matthew Boulton, in partnership with Argand, in 1784 and became the standard for lighthouses for over a century.
South Foreland Lighthouse was the first tower to successfully use an electric light in 1875. The lighthouse’s carbon arc lamps were powered by a steam-driven magneto.[11] John Richardson Wigham was the first to develop a system for gas illumination of lighthouses. His improved gas ‘crocus’ burner at the Baily Lighthouse near Dublin was 13 times more powerful than the most brilliant light then known.[12]
The vaporized oil burner was invented in 1901 by Arthur Kitson, and improved by David Hood at Trinity House. The fuel was vaporized at high pressure and burned to heat the mantle, giving an output of over six times the luminosity of traditional oil lights. The use of gas as illuminant became widely available with the invention of the Dalén light by Swedish engineer, Gustaf Dalén. He used Agamassan (Aga), a substrate, to absorb the gas allowing safe storage and hence commercial exploitation. Dalén also invented the ‘sun valve’, which automatically regulated the light and turned it off during the daytime. The technology was the predominant form of light source in lighthouses from the 1900s through the 1960s, when electric lighting had become dominant.[13]
Optical systems[edit]

Diagram depicting how a spherical Fresnel lens collimates light
With the development of the steady illumination of the Argand lamp, the application of optical lenses to increase and focus the light intensity became a practical possibility. William Hutchinson developed the first practical optical system in 1763, known as a catoptric system. This rudimentary system effectively collimated the emitted light into a concentrated beam, thereby greatly increasing the light’s visibility.[14] The ability to focus the light led to the first revolving lighthouse beams, where the light would appear to the mariners as a series of intermittent flashes. It also became possible to transmit complex signals using the light flashes.
French physicist and engineer Augustin-Jean Fresnel developed the multi-part Fresnel lens for use in lighthouses. His design allowed for the construction of lenses of large aperture and short focal length, without the mass and volume of material that would be required by a lens of conventional design. A Fresnel lens can be made much thinner than a comparable conventional lens, in some cases taking the form of a flat sheet. A Fresnel lens can also capture more oblique light from a light source, thus allowing the light from a lighthouse equipped with one, to be visible over greater distances.
The first Fresnel lens was used in 1823 in the Cordouan lighthouse at the mouth of the Gironde estuary; its light could be seen from more than 20 miles (32 km) out.[15] Fresnel’s invention increased the luminosity of the lighthouse lamp by a factor of 4 and his system is still in common use.
Recent[edit]
The advent of electrification, and automatic lamp changers began to make lighthouse keepers obsolete. For many years, lighthouses still had keepers, partly because lighthouse keepers could serve as a rescue service if necessary. Improvements in maritime navigation and safety such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) have led to the phasing out of non-automated lighthouses across the world.[16] In Canada, this trend has been stopped and there are still 50 staffed light stations, with 27 on the west coast alone.[17]
Remaining modern lighthouses are more functional and less picturesque; usually they use solar-charged batteries and have a single stationary flashing light sitting on a steel skeleton tower.[18]
Famous lighthouse builders[edit]

Sir James Douglass was a prolific lighthouse builder and designer in the late 19th century.
John Smeaton is noteworthy for having designed the third and most famous Eddystone Lighthouse but some builders are well known for their work in building multiple lighthouses. The Stevenson family (Robert, Alan, David, Thomas, David Alan, and Charles) made lighthouse building a three generation profession in Scotland. Irishman Alexander Mitchell invented and built a number of screwpile lighthouses despite his blindness. Englishman James Douglass was knighted for his work on lighthouses.
United States Army Corps of Engineers Lieutenant George Meade built numerous lighthouses along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts before gaining wider fame as the winning general at the Battle of Gettysburg. Colonel Orlando M. Poe, engineer to General William Tecumseh Sherman in the Siege of Atlanta, designed and built some of the most exotic lighthouses in the most difficult locations on the U.S. Great Lakes.[19]
French merchant navy officer Marius Michel Pasha built almost a hundred lighthouses along the coasts of the Ottoman Empire in a period of twenty years after the Crimean War (1853–1856).[20]
Lighthouse technology[edit]
Power[edit]
In a lighthouse, the source of light is called the “lamp” (whether electric or fueled by oil) and the concentration of the light is by the “lens” or “optic”. Originally lit by open fires and later candles, the Argand hollow wick lamp and parabolic reflector were introduced in the late 18th century.
Whale oil was also used with wicks as the source of light. Kerosene became popular in the 1870s and electricity and carbide (acetylene gas) began replacing kerosene around the turn of the 20th century.[18] Carbide was promoted by the Dalén light which automatically lit the lamp at nightfall and extinguished it at dawn.
Lens[edit]
See also: Fresnel lens

Cape Meares Lighthouse; first-order Fresnel lens
Before modern strobe lights, lenses were used to concentrate the light from a continuous source. Vertical light rays of the lamp are redirected into a horizontal plane, and horizontally the light is focused into one or a few directions at a time, with the light beam swept around. As a result, in addition to seeing the side of the light beam, the light is directly visible from greater distances, and with an identifying light characteristic.
This concentration of light is accomplished with a rotating lens assembly. In early lighthouses, the light source was a kerosene lamp or, earlier, an animal or vegetable oil Argand lamp, and the lenses rotated by a weight driven clockwork assembly wound by lighthouse keepers, sometimes as often as every two hours. The lens assembly sometimes floated in liquid mercury to reduce friction. In more modern lighthouses, electric lights and motor drives were used, generally powered by diesel electric generators. These also supplied electricity for the lighthouse keepers.[18]
Efficiently concentrating the light from a large omnidirectional light source requires a very large diameter lens. This would require a very thick and heavy lens if a conventional lens were used. The Fresnel lens (pronounced /freɪˈnɛl/) focused 85% of a lamp’s light versus the 20% focused with the parabolic reflectors of the time. Its design enabled construction of lenses of large size and short focal length without the weight and volume of material in conventional lens designs.[21]
Fresnel lighthouse lenses are ranked by order, a measure of refracting power, with a first order lens being the largest, most powerful and expensive; and a sixth order lens being the smallest. The order is based on the focal length of the lens. A first order lens has the longest focal length, with the sixth being the shortest. Coastal lighthouses generally use first, second, or third order lenses, while harbor lights and beacons use fourth, fifth, or sixth order lenses.[22]
Some lighthouses, such as those at Cape Race, Newfoundland, and Makapuu Point, Hawaii, used a more powerful hyperradiant Fresnel lens manufactured by the firm of Chance Brothers.
In recent times, many Fresnel lenses have been replaced by rotating aerobeacons which require less maintenance. In modern automated lighthouses, this system of rotating lenses is often replaced by a high intensity light that emits brief omnidirectional flashes (concentrating the light in time rather than direction). These lights are similar to obstruction lights used to warn aircraft of tall structures. Recent innovations are “Vega Lights”, and initial experiments with light-emitting diode (LED) panels.[18]
Light characteristics[edit]
See also: Light characteristic
In any of these designs an observer, rather than seeing a continuous weak light, sees a brighter light during short time intervals. These instants of bright light are arranged to create a light characteristic or, pattern specific to a lighthouse.[23] For example, the Scheveningen Lighthouse flashes are alternately 2.5 and 7.5 seconds. Some lights have sectors of a particular color (usually formed by colored panes in the lantern) to distinguish safe water areas from dangerous shoals. Modern lighthouses often have unique reflectors or Racon transponders so the radar signature of the light is also unique.
Building[edit]
Design[edit]

Architect’s design of Split Rock Lighthouse

Architecture of 1909 lighthouses in Finland
For effectiveness, the lamp must be high enough to be seen before the danger is reached by a mariner. The minimum height is calculated by trigonometric formula d is 1.17 times the square root of H where H is the height above water in feet, and d is the distance to the horizon in nautical miles.[24]
Where dangerous shoals are located far off a flat sandy beach, the prototypical tall masonry coastal lighthouse is constructed to assist the navigator making a landfall after an ocean crossing. Often these are cylindrical to reduce the effect of wind on a tall structure, such as Cape May Light. Smaller versions of this design are often used as harbor lights to mark the entrance into a harbor, such as New London Harbor Light.
Where a tall cliff exists, a smaller structure may be placed on top such as at Horton Point Light. Sometimes, such a location can be too high, for example along the west coast of the United States, where frequent low clouds can obscure the light. In these cases, lighthouses are placed below clifftop to ensure that they can still be seen at the surface during periods of fog or low clouds, as at Point Reyes Lighthouse. Another victim of fog was the Old Point Loma lighthouse, which was replaced in 1891 with a lower lighthouse, New Point Loma lighthouse.
As technology advanced, prefabricated skeletal iron or steel structures tended to be used for lighthouses constructed in the 20th century. These often have a narrow cylindrical core surrounded by an open lattice work bracing, such as Finns Point Range Light.
Sometimes a lighthouse needs to be constructed in the water itself. Wave-washed lighthouses are masonry structures constructed to withstand water impact, such as Eddystone Lighthouse in Britain and the St. George Reef Light off California. In shallower bays, Screw-pile lighthouse ironwork structures are screwed into the seabed and a low wooden structure is placed above the open framework, such as Thomas Point Shoal Lighthouse. As screw piles can be disrupted by ice, steel caisson lighthouses such as Orient Point Light are used in cold climates. Orient Long Beach Bar Light (Bug Light) is a blend of a screw pile light that was converted to a caisson light because of the threat of ice damage.[25]
In waters too deep for a conventional structure, a lightship might be used instead of a lighthouse, such as the former lightship Columbia. Most of these have now been replaced by fixed light platforms (such as Ambrose Light) similar to those used for offshore oil exploration.[26]

The Light-house on Point of Air, Flintshire, 1815

Eddystone Lighthouse, one of the first wave-washed lighthouses

Hyperboloid design Adziogol Lighthouse by V.G.Shukhov, Ukraine, 1910

Kõpu Lighthouse has the shape of a square prism, with massive counterforts

Iron quadripod lighthouse from 1877 in Ruhnu island

Components[edit]

Lighthouse lantern room from mid-1800s
While lighthouse buildings differ depending on the location and purpose, they tend to have common components.
A light station comprises the lighthouse tower and all outbuildings, such as the keeper’s living quarters, fuel house, boathouse, and fog-signaling building. The Lighthouse itself consists of a tower structure supporting the lantern room where the light operates.
The lantern room is the glassed-in housing at the top of a lighthouse tower containing the lamp and lens. Its glass storm panes are supported by metal Astragal bars running vertically or diagonally. At the top of the lantern room is a stormproof ventilator designed to remove the smoke of the lamps and the heat that builds in the glass enclosure. A lightning rod and grounding system connected to the metal cupola roof provides a safe conduit for any lightning strikes.
Immediately beneath the lantern room is usually a Watch Room or Service Room where fuel and other supplies were kept and where the keeper prepared the lanterns for the night and often stood watch. The clockworks (for rotating the lenses) were also located there. On a lighthouse tower, an open platform called the gallery is often located outside the watch room (called the Main Gallery) or Lantern Room (Lantern Gallery). This was mainly used for cleaning the outside of the windows of the Lantern Room.[27]
Lighthouses near to each other that are similar in shape are often painted in a unique pattern so they can easily be recognized during daylight, a marking known as a daymark. The black and white barber pole spiral pattern of Cape Hatteras Lighthouse is one example. Race Rocks Light in western Canada is painted in horizontal black and white bands to stand out against the horizon.
Range lights[edit]
Main article: Range lights

Range Lights in Margaree Harbour, Nova Scotia. When the vessel is on the correct course, the two lights line up above one another.
Aligning two fixed points on land provides a navigator with a line of position called a range in the U.S. and a transit in Britain. Ranges can be used to precisely align a vessel within a narrow channel such as in a river. With landmarks of a range illuminated with a set of fixed lighthouses, nighttime navigation is possible.
Such paired lighthouses are called range lights in the U.S. and leading lights in the United Kingdom. The closer light is referred to as the beacon or front range; the furthest away is called the rear range. The rear range light is almost always taller than the front.
When the vessel is on the correct course, the two lights line up vertically. But when the observer is out of position, the difference in alignment indicates the proper direction of travel to correct the course.
Maintenance[edit]
In the United States, lighthouses are maintained by the United States Coast Guard (USCG).[28] Those in England and Wales are looked after by Trinity House; in Scotland, by the Northern Lighthouse Board; and in Ireland by the Commissioners of Irish Lights. In Canada, they are managed by the Canadian Coast Guard. In Australia, lighthouses are conducted by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority.
The Soviet Union built a number of automated lighthouses powered by radioisotope thermoelectric generators in remote locations. They operated for long periods without external support with great reliability.[29] However numerous installations deteriorated, were stolen, or vandalized. Some cannot be found due to poor record keeping.[30]
Preservation[edit]
As lighthouses became less essential to navigation, many of their historic structures faced demolition or neglect. In the United States, the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act of 2000 provides for the transfer of lighthouse structures to local governments and private non-profit groups, while the USCG continues to maintain the lamps and lenses. In Canada, the Nova Scotia Lighthouse Preservation Society won heritage status for Sambro Island Lighthouse, and sponsored the Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act to change Canadian federal laws to protect lighthouses.[31]
Many groups formed to restore and save lighthouses around the world. They include the World Lighthouse Society and the United States Lighthouse Society.[32] A further international group is the Amateur Radio Lighthouse Society, which sends amateur radio operators to publicize the preservation of remote lighthouses throughout the world.[33]
Popular culture and symbolism[edit]

Split Point Lighthouse, used in the popular Australian TV series Round the Twist
Visiting and photographing lighthouses are popular hobbies as is collecting ceramic replicas. Some lighthouses are popular travel destinations in their own right, and the buildings maintained as tourist attractions. In the U.S., National Lighthouse and Lightship Weekend is celebrated on the first weekend of August, and International Lighthouse and Lightship Weekend on the third weekend. Many lighthouses are open to the public and amateur radio operators communicate between them on these days.
Lighthouses are popular icons on vehicle license plates. Barnegat Lighthouse, Tuckerton Island Lighthouse, Thomas Point Shoal Light, Saybrook Breakwater Light, White Shoal Light, and Biloxi Light are so depicted.[34]
To recognize the role of lighthouse keepers in maritime safety, the U.S. Coast Guard named a class of 175-foot (53 m) coastal buoy tenders after famous U.S. lighthouse keepers. Fourteen ships in the class were built between 1996 and 2000.[35]
Due to their function as beacons of safety, organizations choose lighthouses as a symbol. The lighthouse is the symbol of Lighthouse International, a U.S. organization for the blind.[36] Lighthouses are often interpreted in dreams as beacons of truth or as male fertility and influence.
Lighthouses were once regarded as an archetypal public good, because ships could benefit from the light without being forced to pay. The Confederate States Constitution explicitly allowed public funds to be spent on navigation, including lighthouses.[37]
A widely disseminated urban legend tells of a radio conversation between a U.S. or British naval vessel and what is believed to be another ship on a collision course. The naval vessel insists the other ship change course, but the other ship continues to insist the naval vessel do so. After the captain of the naval vessel identifies himself and demands a course change, the other party responds with, “I’m a lighthouse. It’s your call”.
The Disney film Pete’s Dragon featured a lighthouse, and the resulting Helen Reddy song “Candle on the Water” alludes to it. The Australian television series Round the Twist involved a family living at Split Point Lighthouse. The long-running American soap opera Guiding Light has featured a lighthouse in many of its opening title segments, and the fictional Springfield, Illinois has a lighthouse situated near the town.[38]
Their isolated and mysterious nature makes lighthouses a frequent setting of horror and suspense films, as well as adventure video games. A lighthouse played a pivotal role in Martin Scorsese’s 2010 film Shutter Island, and was featured in the final shot of the film.
An island with a lighthouse is the setting of Tove Jansson’s novel Moominpappa at Sea and the isolated nature of the lighthouse surrounded by the sea also is a reference to the states of mind of the main characters of the novel.
St. Anthony’s Lighthouse at St. Anthony’s Head near Falmouth, Cornwall, was featured in the title sequence of the children’s live action puppet television program series Fraggle Rock created by Jim Henson.
The Adventures of Portland Bill was a British stop motion animated children’s television series made in 1983. Set in a fictional lighthouse, the name of its main character was a reference to the Portland Bill Lighthouse in Dorset. Many of the other characters were plays on the names of coastal regions, made familiar to the wider public by the BBC Radio 4 Shipping Forecast.
The Little Red Lighthouse in New York City is the hero of the 1942 children’s book The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge by Hildegarde Swift.
Heraldry[edit]
Lighthouses are used as charges in heraldry, especially for towns along the seaside.

Kreis Südtondern

Amt Südtondern

Pommerby

Bastorf

Borkum

Dahme (Holstein)

Sassnitz arms since 1959

Gallery[edit]

Tower of Hercules in A Coruña, Spain. Built by the Romans, it’s the world’s oldest lighthouse that is still in working condition.

Cabo Branco Lighthouse in João Pessoa, Brazil is a major attraction at the easternmost inland point of the Americas

A rarer type of lighthouse on stilts in the Hauraki Gulf of New Zealand. Mostly protected by nearby islands, Bean Rock lighthouse lights the way into the Waitemata Harbour.

Lighthouse “El Faro”, Maspalomas, Gran Canaria.

Lighthouse “Lobito” in Lobito, Angola

The Knarrarósviti Lighthouse is a two-staged tower, built in 1938-1939, located near the town of Stokkseyri. Iceland.

The Vypin Lighthouse at Kochi, India. The structure (built in 1979) has an unusual cross section.

The Rawley Point Lighthouse near Two Rivers, Wisconsin at Point Beach State Forest shows an example of an octagonal skeletal structure.

Baltic coast lighthouse, located in Niechorze, Poland

Peggys Point Lighthouse, Nova Scotia, Canada

Small non-attendant lighthouse at Gullringnes in Vardø, North Norway.

Keri Lighthouse in Estonia was the first lighthouse in the world to be powered by natural gas.

Suurupi front lighthouse, built in 1859, is the only working wooden lighthouse in Estonia.

Grand Island East Channel Light, a wooden lighthouse built in 1867 on Grand Island in Lake Superior, near Munising, Michigan, U.S.A.

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12 January 2016

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Ukraine: Protests across Ukraine against Russian cigarettes
Agence France-Presse

Hundreds of activists in several Ukrainian cities blockaded on Tuesday the cigarette distribution centres owned by a Russian tycoon with alleged links to ousted pro-Moscow president Viktor Yanukovych.

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11 Beautiful Japanese Words That Don’t Exist In English | The Odyssey

Image Credit: Wookmark.com
11 Beautiful Japanese Words That Don’t Exist In English
Untranslatable words from Japan, the polite and nature-loving country.
Marie Sugio in Lifestyle on Nov 16, 2015

Once, when I asked my friend from a small tribe in Burma how they would say “breakfast” there, she told me that they didn’t have a word for it because they only ate twice a day–lunch and dinner. I happen to have a lot of friends who speak English as their second language and that made me realize that a language has a lot to do with its culture’s uniqueness. Because of that there are some untranslatable words.
In Japanese culture, people have a lot of appreciation towards nature and it is very important to be polite towards others. That politeness and the nature appreciation reflected on to its language and created some beautiful words that are not translatable to English.

いただきます Itadakimasu

“Itadakimasu” means “I will have this.” It is used before eating any food to express appreciation and respect for life, nature, the person who prepared the food, the person who served the food, and everything else that is related to eating.

おつかれさま Otsukaresama

“Otsukaresama” means “you’re tired.” It is used to let someone know that you recognize his/her hard work and that you are thankful for it.

木漏れ日 Komorebi

“Komorebi” refers to the sunlight that filters through the leaves of trees.

木枯らし Kogarashi

“Kogarashi” is the cold wind that lets us know of the arrival of winter.

物の哀れ Mononoaware

“Monoaware” is “the pathos of things.” It is the awareness of the impermanence of all things and the gentle sadness and wistfulness at their passing.

森林浴 Shinrinyoku

“Shinrinyoku” (“forest bathing”) is to go deep into the woods where everything is silent and peaceful for a relaxation.

幽玄 Yuugen

“Yuugen” is an awareness of the universe that triggers emotional responses that are too mysterious and deep for words.

しょうがない Shoganai

The literal meaning of “Shoganai” is “it cannot be helped.” However, it is not discouraging or despairing. It means to accept that something was out of your control. It encourages people to realize that it wasn’t their fault and to move on with no regret.

金継ぎ/金繕い kintsuki/kintsukuroi

“Kintsukuroi” is the art of repairing pottery with gold or silver joining the pieces and understanding that the piece is more beautiful for having been broken.

わびさび Wabi-sabi

“Wabi-sabi” refers to a way of living that focuses on finding beauty within the imperfections of life and peacefully accepting the natural cycle of growth and decay.

擬音語 All the onomatopoeia

English has onomatopoeia, but Japanese has far more. For example, we have “om-nom-nom” for eating and they have “paku-paku” for eating normally, “baku-baku” for eating wildly, “gatsu-gatsu” for eating fast, “mogu-mogu” for chewing a lot, etc. Doesn’t it make your head spin? The onomatopoeia for that kind of dizziness is “kurukuru” by the way. The image above is showing some of those onomatopoeia. As you can see, Japanese onomatopoeia is usually a repetitive sound. Although it might be a very difficult concept to understand, it adds a melody and an emotional meaning to a word. Japanese sounds poetic because of the onomatopoeia.

Marie Sugio
A happy-go-lucky girl with a passion for eating, singing and laughing.

via 11 Beautiful Japanese Words That Don’t Exist In English | The Odyssey.

Ethics Guy – The Newsletter I like and recommend.

I subscribe to this newsletter and recommend to my readers.

Maui sunset * Photo by Bruce Weinstein

Business Leaders Get an ‘F’ in Ethics, Again
But it’s more profitable—and just right—to instill honorable conduct at every level of a company
The Ethics Guy’s Newsletter
January 9, 2016
“The only people less ethical than business executives are telemarketers, lobbyists, and members of Congress.”

That sounds like something Louis C.K. might say in his stand-up act, but it’s no joke: this is how most Americans responded in a recent Gallup poll.

Each year, Gallup asks people to rate the honesty and ethics of a range of professionals. In 2015, nurses again topped the list, followed by pharmacists, physicians, and high school teachers. Journalists, bankers, and building contractors occupied the middle, and, as has been the case for many years, business executives were close to the bottom.

There are three points worth making about the low rating the public gives business people:
1,  It’s worth taking seriously.
2,  It’s bad for business.
3.  It’s reversible. Let’s look at each point more closely.

Poor ethics are no laughing matter
There are over one million responses to a Google search for “business ethics jokes.”  For example, in a Randy Glasbergen cartoon, two businessmen are having lunch.  “The way I see it,” one says to the other, “unethical ethics are better than no ethics at all!”

And in a Matthew Diffee cartoon for The New Yorker, a board member tells his colleagues, “It’s just us today. Campbell called in ethical.”

The reason these jokes work is because they squeeze humor from a nasty truth: Too often, business leaders and the companies they represent take the low road.

When Takata air bag engineer Bob Schubert writes “Happy Manipulating!” in an email to colleagues, or Volkswagen admits to creating technology that would allow its cars to evade clean air rules, the grave risk to the basic tenets of business ethics and simple decency is serious, real, and far from funny.

This may be a strange thing to say in a business publication, but some things more important than making money. These include not hurting people, being truthful, respecting client confidentiality, and treating employees fairly—the principles of ethics, in other words.

High character is good for business
It turns out that companies that take ethics seriously aren’t merely doing the right thing. They’re doing the profitable thing, too.

As I explored in an article about Kickstarter, it’s possible for a company to be both in the right and in the chips. In fact, doing both is the only way to succeed. While businesses that engage in unethical behavior to make more money often succeed at that goal, they only do so in the short term.

My father once bought a life insurance policy from an agent I’ll call Eric who turned out to be a crook. For several years, Eric embezzled thousands of dollars from my dad, and I vividly recall the trial in which Eric’s attorney told the jury, “No one will ever trust this man again.”

Eric’s crime allowed him to enjoy some of the finer things in life until the ruse caught up with him. He was sentenced to prison and later died of a heart attack at 62.

Eric’s story stands in sharp contrast to what happened recently to Terry Brock, co-author with Gina Carr of Klout Matters: How to Engage Customers, Build Your Digital Influence—and Raise Your Klout Score For Success.

A potential client asked Terry if he could speak on the topic of how businesses can fight the trend of video conferencing. Terry was loath to turn down a lucrative speaking engagement, but one of his areas of expertise is technology, and he believes there a lot of benefits to virtual meetings.

So Terry decided to be upfront with the client about his concerns. “I told them that when it comes to in-person vs. virtual meetings, the solution is not either/or but both/and,” he said. For his honesty, Terry was rewarded with the speaking engagement—and at a higher fee than the client had ever paid for a presentation.

Business ethics can be improved
Public perception is malleable, so there is no reason why business executives have to remain stuck in the bottom of the Gallup poll. I propose the following four strategies for businesses that want to be regarded as honest and trustworthy:

  1. PUBLICIZE YOUR VALUES.  It never ceases to amaze me how few businesses list their company’s values and ethical commitments on their websites. This is the first Call to Action that I give businesses that hire me as a consultant: put your organization’s mission statement, code of ethics, and core values on the home page where they can be readily accessed.
  2. HIRE FOR CHARACTER. The values and ethical standards you post on your website don’t mean anything if they’re not embodied by your employees. You understandably devote a lot of energy, time, and resources to hiring people who are knowledgeable and skilled. Isn’t it at least as important to hire people who are consistently honest, accountable, loyal, and fair—that is, men and women of high character?
  3. FIRE FOR CHARACTER. Just as it’s crucial to bring high-character people into your organization, so too is it to get rid of those who don’t share your organization’s values. No matter how much the senior vice president of marketing knows about his or her field, if he or she has played fast and loose with the truth or hasn’t honored commitments to clients, why keep him or her on the payroll?
  4. REWARD EXCELLENCE. I recently spoke at a Fortune 100 company on the day when five employees who embodied the company’s values were flown in to receive a prestigious award and a handsome bonus. One young man had found a $15,000 diamond ring in his store’s parking lot and had gone to considerable lengths to track down the owner. Imagine how the customer felt when her ring was returned. And imagine the positive word-of-mouth she gave the company.

For Terry Brock, the technology speaker I cited earlier, the message of his own story isn’t necessarily that honesty pays. Rather, it’s that honesty is valuable for its own sake. “When you value the truth above money,” he said, “sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, but either way, you get the pride that comes only from running your business with integrity.”
*   *   *

The above essay was just published in Fortune.  Please consider leaving a comment and sharing the the column here.  Thank you kindly.

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Happy New Year!  May 2016 be your best year yet.
Bruce

Bruce Weinstein, Ph.D.
The Ethics Guy®
FORTUNE Contributor
Author, The Good Ones: Ten Crucial Qualities of High-Character Employees

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QUOTE OF THE WEEK

A wise person knows when and how to make the exception to every rule. A wise person knows how to improvise. Real-world problems are often ambiguous and ill-defined and the context is always changing. A wise person is like a jazz musician — using the notes on the page, but dancing around them, inventing combinations that are appropriate for the situation and the people at hand.”

Barry Schwarz
Our loss of wisdom

C-Suite Executive Job Search and Career Management

via C-Suite Executive Job Search and Career Management.

Interesting article. Sharing.

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Can we build-up a productive and sustained industrial relations?

via Can we build-up a productive and sustained industrial relations?. Good article.

Is Your Second Toe Longer Than Your Other Toes? You Might Want to Read This! –

via Is Your Second Toe Longer Than Your Other Toes? You Might Want to Read This! –.